Commands by UncleLouie (2)

  • Provides a recursive time ordered list of the current directory over the last 3 minutes. Excluding zero byte files: ls -lF -darth `find . -size +0 -mmin -3` For the last day's files, change "-mmin -3" to "-mtime -1": ls -lF -darth `find . -size +0 -mtime -1` Show Sample Output


    -2
    ls -lF -darth `find . -mmin -3`
    UncleLouie · 2014-03-22 16:52:20 0
  • This can be easier to look at in ls output. Not as clean as +%Y%m%dT%H%M%S, but quicker to write. Show Sample Output


    0
    alias t__s='date "+%FT%T"'
    UncleLouie · 2014-03-06 04:37:55 0

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Gets the english pronunciation of a phrase
Usage examples: say hello say "hello world" say hello+world

Print one . instead of each line
If you're running a command with a lot of output, this serves as a simple progress indicator. This avoids the need to use `/dev/null` for silencing. It works for any command that outputs lines, updates live (`fflush` avoids buffering), and is simple to understand.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Insert commas to make reading numbers easier in the output of ls
This modifies the output of ls so that the file size has commas every three digits. It makes room for the commas by destructively eating any characters to the left of the size, which is probably okay since that's just the "group".   Note that I did not write this, I merely cleaned it up and shortened it with extended regular expressions. The original shell script, entitled "sl", came with this description:    : '  : For tired eyes (sigh), do an ls -lF plus whatever other flags you give  : but expand the file size with commas every 3 digits. Really helps me  : distinguish megabytes from hundreds of kbytes...  :  : Corey Satten, [email protected], 11/8/89  : '   Of course, some may suggest that fancy new "human friendly" options, like "ls -Shrl", have made Corey's script obsolete. They are probably right. Yet, at times, still I find it handy. The new-fangled "human-readable" numbers can be annoying when I have to glance at the letter at the end to figure out what order of magnitude is even being talked about. (There's a big difference between 386M and 386P!). But with this nifty script, the number itself acts like a histogram, a quick visual indicator of "bigness" for tired eyes. :-)

Update twitter with curl
Same as below, but no quotes are necessary when twitting more than one word

Arch Linux sort installed packages by size
This one-liner will output installed packages sorted by size in Kilobytes.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Repeat a portrait eight times so it can be cut out from a 6"x4" photo and used for visa or passport photos
Yes, You could do it in the GIMP or even use Inkscape to auto-align the clones, but the command line is so much easier. NOTE: The +clone and -clone options are just to shorten the command line instead of typing the same filename eight times. It might also speed up the montage by only processing the image once, but I'm not sure. "+clone" duplicates the previous image, the following two "-clone"s duplicate the first two and then the first four images. NOTE2: The -frame option is just so that I have some lines to cut along. BUG: I haven't bothered to calculate the exact geometry (width and height) of each image since that was not critical for the visa photos I need. If it matters for you, it should be easy enough to set using the -geometry flag near the end of the command. For example, if you have your DPI set to 600, you could use "-geometry 800x1200!" to make each subimage 1⅓ x 2 inches. You may want to use ImageMagick's "-density 600" option to put a flag in the JPEG file cuing the printer that it is a 600 DPI image. BUG2: ImageMagick does not autorotate images based on the EXIF information. Since the portrait photo was taken with the camera sideways, I made the JPEG rotate using jhead like so: jhead -autorot 2007-08-25-3685.jpg

Encode/Decode text to/from Base64 on a Mac w/out Mac Ports
I have a mac, and do not want to install mac ports to get the base64 binary. Using openssl will do the trick just fine. Note, to decode base64, specify a '-d' after 'base64' in the command. Note also the files base64.decoded.txt and base64.encoded.txt are text files.


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