Commands by aikikode (2)

  • This command will allow to search for duplicate processes and sort them by their run count. Note that if there are same processes run by different users you'll see only one user in the result line, so you'll need to do: ps aux | grep <process> to see all users that run this command. Show Sample Output


    2
    ps aux | sort --key=11 | uniq -c -d --skip-fields=10 | sort -nr --key=1,1
    aikikode · 2011-07-19 07:11:29 0
  • After executing a command with multiple arguments like cp ./temp/test.sh ~/prog/ifdown.sh you can paste any argument of the previous command to the console, like ls -l ALT+1+. is equivalent to ls -l ./temp/test.sh ALT+0+. stands for command itself ('ls' in this case) Simple ALT+. cycles through last arguments of previous commands.


    12
    <ALT>+<.> or <ALT>+<NUM>+<.> or <ALT>+<NUM>,<ALT>+<.>
    aikikode · 2011-03-01 17:41:08 0

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

modify a file in place with perl
changes THIS to THAT in all files matching fileglob* without using secondary files

return a titlecased version of the string[str.title() in python]

Find the package that installed a command

Find the package that installed a command

Remove all mail in Postfix mail queue.

nice disk usage, sorted by size, see description for full command
full command below, would not let me put full command in text box du -sk ./* | sort -nr | awk 'BEGIN{ pref[1]="K"; pref[2]="M"; pref[3]="G";} { total = total + $1; x = $1; y = 1; while( x > 1024 ) { x = (x + 1023)/1024; y++; } printf("%g%s\t%s\n",int(x*10)/10,pref[y],$2); } END { y = 1; while( total > 1024 ) { total = (total + 1023)/1024; y++; } printf("Total: %g%s\n",int(total*10)/10,pref[y]); }'

List files with quotes around each filename

Avoids ssh timeouts by sending a keep alive message to the server every 60 seconds
ssh_config is the system-wide configuration file for ssh. For per-user configuration, which allows for different settings for each host: $echo 'ServerAliveInterval 60' >> ~/.ssh/ssh_config On OSX: $echo 'ServerAliveInterval 60' >> ~/.ssh/config or $echo 'ServerAliveInterval 60' >> ~/etc/ssh_config

Resize an image to at least a specific resolution
This command will resize an image (keeping the aspect ratio) to a specific resolution, meaning the resulting image will never be smaller than this resolution. For example, if we have a 2048x1000 image, the output would be 1229x600, not 1024x600 or 1024x500. Same thing for the height, if the image is 2000x1200, the output would be 1024x614.

send DD a signal to print its progress
Sends the "USR1" signal every 1 second (-n 1) to a process called exactly "dd". The signal in some systems can be INFO or SIGINFO ... look at the signals list in: man kill


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: