Commands by aikikode (2)

  • This command will allow to search for duplicate processes and sort them by their run count. Note that if there are same processes run by different users you'll see only one user in the result line, so you'll need to do: ps aux | grep <process> to see all users that run this command. Show Sample Output


    2
    ps aux | sort --key=11 | uniq -c -d --skip-fields=10 | sort -nr --key=1,1
    aikikode · 2011-07-19 07:11:29 0
  • After executing a command with multiple arguments like cp ./temp/test.sh ~/prog/ifdown.sh you can paste any argument of the previous command to the console, like ls -l ALT+1+. is equivalent to ls -l ./temp/test.sh ALT+0+. stands for command itself ('ls' in this case) Simple ALT+. cycles through last arguments of previous commands.


    12
    <ALT>+<.> or <ALT>+<NUM>+<.> or <ALT>+<NUM>,<ALT>+<.>
    aikikode · 2011-03-01 17:41:08 0

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