Commands by alafrosty (1)

  • * Find all file sizes and file names from the current directory down (replace "." with a target directory as needed). * sort the file sizes in numeric order * List only the duplicated file sizes * drop the file sizes so there are simply a list of files (retain order) * calculate md5sums on all of the files * replace the first instance of two spaces (md5sum output) with a \0 * drop the unique md5sums so only duplicate files remain listed * Use AWK to aggregate identical files on one line. * Remove the blank line from the beginning (This was done more efficiently by putting another "IF" into the AWK command, but then the whole line exceeded the 255 char limit). >>>> Each output line contains the md5sum and then all of the files that have that identical md5sum. All fields are \0 delimited. All records are \n delimited.


    0
    find . -type f -not -empty -printf "%-25s%p\n"|sort -n|uniq -D -w25|cut -b26-|xargs -d"\n" -n1 md5sum|sed "s/ /\x0/"|uniq -D -w32|awk -F"\0" 'BEGIN{l="";}{if(l!=$1||l==""){printf "\n%s\0",$1}printf "\0%s",$2;l=$1}END{printf "\n"}'|sed "/^$/d"
    alafrosty · 2013-10-22 13:34:19 2

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