Commands by bouktin (3)

  • list the top 15 folders by decreasing size in MB Show Sample Output


    2
    du -xB M --max-depth=2 /var | sort -rn | head -n 15
    bouktin · 2013-05-23 10:45:21 0
  • remove all carriage return of a given file (or input, if used with | ) and replace them with a space (or whatever character is after %s) Show Sample Output


    -1
    awk ' { printf ("%s ", $0)} END {printf ("\n") } ' FILE
    bouktin · 2011-02-02 11:51:41 3
  • find the files locked by rcs utility Show Sample Output


    0
    find /path/to/folder/ -mindepth 1 -maxdepth 2 -name "*,v" -exec sudo rlog -L -R {} \;
    bouktin · 2011-01-13 16:07:42 1

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