Commands by evenme (3)

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Using json.tool from the shell to validate and pretty-print

Fast portscanner via Parallel

dstat- this command is powerful one to monitor system activity . It has combined the power of vmstat,iostat,mpstat,df,free,sar .
As mentioned in the summery that it is a powerful command to monitor system activity in great way. It has got the power of vmstat,iostat,mpstat,df,free and sar.Instead of firing each single command separately ,one can fire one single command to get all the info at once.But there is a way to get the individual information too. Please see the man page . You can get it from here : http://dag.wieers.com/home-made/dstat/

Benchmark SQL Query
Benchmark a SQL query against MySQL Server. The example runs the query 10 times, and you get the average runtime in the output. To ensure that the query does not get cached, use `RESET QUERY CACHE;` on top in the query file.

Search and play MP3 from Skreemr
This use the Screemr search engine to play mp3 songs

View All Processess Cmdlines and Environments
Grabs the cmdline used to execute the process, and the environment that the process is being run under. This is much different than the 'env' command, which only lists the environment for the shell. This is very useful (to me at least) to debug various processes on my server. For example, this lets me see the environment that my apache, mysqld, bind, and other server processes have. Here's a function I use: $ aa_ps_all () { ( cd /proc && command ps -A -opid= | xargs -I'{}' sh -c 'test $PPID -ne {}&&test -r {}/cmdline&&echo -e "\n[{}]"&&tr -s "\000" " "

diff files while disregarding indentation and trailing white space
**NOTE** Tekhne's alternative is much more succinct and its output conforms to the files actual contents rather than with white space removed My command on the other hand uses bash process substitution (and "Minimal" Perl), instead of files, to first remove leading and trailing white space from lines, before diff'ing the streams. Very useful when differences in indentation, such as in programming source code files, may be irrelevant

easily find megabyte eating files or directories
sorts the files by integer megabytes, which should be enough to (interactively) find the space wasters. Now you can $ dush for the above output, $ dush -n 3 for only the 3 biggest files and so on. It's always a good idea to have this line in your .profile or .bashrc

a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.


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