Commands by evilsoup (3)

  • Requires ImageMagick to be installed; mogrify is the lesser-known sibling to convert -- it overwrites your original images, but allows you to work on batches of files without resorting to a loop.


    0
    mogrify -resize 852x480 ./*.png
    evilsoup · 2013-12-24 12:42:06 0
  • An entirely shell-based solution (should work on any bourne-style shell), more portable on relying on the rename command, the exact nature of which varies from distro to distro.


    3
    for f in ./*.xls; do mv "$f" "${f%.*}.ods"; done
    evilsoup · 2013-09-17 01:41:56 0
  • Here's the other way of doing it in vim: setting a recursive macro. 'gg' brings you to the top of the buffer, 'qqq' clears the 'q' macro, 'qq' starts recording a macro called 'q', '/^$' moves the cursor to the next empty line, 'dd' deletes the line that the cursor is on, '@q' calls the 'q' macro (currently empty because of 'qqq'), and 'q' stops recording the macro. '@q' calls the macro. It will run until it cannot find another blank line, at which point it will throw up an error and cease. While this is longer than the regex, you can use it without having to move your thoughts from 'vim-mode' to 'regex-mode'.


    -2
    ggqqqqq/^$dd@qq@q
    evilsoup · 2013-08-16 20:37:44 0

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Find out how old a web page is
I used to use the Firefox "View page info" feature a lot to determine how stale the web page I was looking at was. Now that I use mostly Chrome I miss that feature, so here is a command line alternative using wget. The -S says to display the server response, the --spider says to not download any files/pages, just fetch the header. The output goes to stderr, so to grep it you use 2>&1 to combine the stderr stream with stdout, the pipe that to grep for Last-Modified. You can use curl instead if you have it installed, like this: $ curl --head -s http://osswin.sourceforge.net | grep Mod

Get the Volume labels all bitlocker volumes had before being encrypted
Get information of volume labels of bitlocker volumes, even if they are encrypted and locked (no access to filesystem, no password provided). Note that the volume labels can have spaces, but only if you name then before encryption. Renaming a bitlocker partition after being encrypted does not have the same effect as doing it before.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Outputs a 10-digit random number

start a vnc server session to connect to a gdm login screen

Processes by CPU usage

Opens vi/vim at pattern in file
Open up vi or vim at the first instance of a pattern in [file]. Useful if you know where you want to be, like "PermitRootLogin" in sshd_config. Also, vi +10 [file] will open up a file at line 10. VERY useful when you get "error at line 10" type of output.

resume other user's screen session via su, without pty error
Normally, if you su to another user from root and try to resume that other user's screen session, you will get an error like "Cannot open your terminal '/dev/pts/0' - please check." This is because the other user doesn't have permission for root's pty. You can get around this by running a "script" session as the new user, before trying to resume the screen session. Note you will have to execute each of the three commands separately, not all on the same line as shown here. Credit: I found this at http://www.hjackson.org/blog/archives/2008/11/29/cannot-open-your-terminal-dev-pts-please-check.

Run a command, store the output in a pastebin on the internet and place the URL on the xclipboard
The URL can then be pasted with a middle click. This is probably useful when trying to explain problems over instant messaging when you don't have some sort of shared desktop.

redirect stdout and stderr each to separate files and print both to the screen


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