Commands by f241vc15 (2)

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Kill all processes that listen to ports begin with 50 (50, 50x, 50xxx,...)
Run netstat as root (via sudo) to get the ID of the process listening on the desired socket. Use awk to 1) match the entry that is the listening socket, 2) matching the exact port (bounded by leading colon and end of column), 3) remove the trailing slash and process name from the last column, and finally 4) use the system(…) command to call kill to terminate the process. Two direct commands, netstat & awk, and one forked call to kill. This does kill the specific port instead of any port that starts with 50. I consider this to be safer.

List all files modified by a command
Often you run a command, but afterwards you're not quite sure what it did. By adding this prefix/suffix around [COMMAND], you can list any files that were modified. . Take a nanosecond timestamp: YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS.NNNNNNNNN $ date "+%F %T.%N" . Find any files that have been modified since that timestamp: $ find . -newermt "$D" . This command currently only searches below the current directory. If you want to look elsewhere change the find parameter, e.g. $ find /var/log . -newermt "$D"

Rename files in batch

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Generate a list of installed packages on Debian-based systems
This command is useful when you want to install the same packages on another fresh OS install for example. To do that, use: $ sudo dpkg --set-selections < LIST_FILE

ls -qahlSr # list all files in size order - largest last
I find it useful, when cleaning up deleting unwanted files to make more space, to list in size order so I can delete the largest first. Note that using "q" shows files with non-printing characters in name. In this sample output (above), I found two copies of the same iso file both of which are immediate "delete candidates" for me.

Alias for lazy tmux create/reattach

AWK Calculator

Edit all files found having a specific string found by grep
The grep switches eliminate the need for awk and sed. Modifying vim with -p will show all files in separate tabs, -o in separate vim windows. Just wish it didn't hose my terminal once I exit vim!!

AES file encryption with openssl
To decrypt: openssl aes-256-cbc -d -in secrets.txt.enc -out secrets.txt.new Reference: http://tombuntu.com/index.php/2007/12/12/simple-file-encryption-with-openssl Optional parameter -a makes output base64 encoded, can be viewed in text editor or pasted in email


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