Commands by fanchok (2)

  • Used in OS X. tr "\n" ";" may be replaced by echo ";" with linux versions of date. I reused ping -q -c 1 www.google.com|tail -1|cut -d/ -f5 Show Sample Output


    0
    while true; do (date | tr "\n" ";") && ping -q -c 1 www.google.com|tail -1|cut -d/ -f5 ;sleep 1; done >> uptime.csv
    fanchok · 2013-02-06 22:06:09 1
  • Depending on your Apache access log configuration you may have to change the sum+=$11 to previous or next awk token. Beware, usually in access log last token is time of response in microseconds, penultimate token is size of response in bytes. You may use this command line to calculate sum and average of responses sizes. You can also refine the egrep regexp to match specific HTTP requests. Show Sample Output


    0
    egrep '.*(("STATUS)|("HEAD)).*' http_access.2012.07.18.log | awk '{sum+=$11; ++n} END {print "Tot="sum"("n")";print "Avg="sum/n}'
    fanchok · 2012-07-27 12:18:29 0

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