Commands by flart (9)

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Substitute audio track of video file using mencoder
Creates a new video file with video stream copied from input file and a different audio stream

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Lists installed kernels

generate iso

Report information about executable launched on system
Aureport is a tool for displaying auditd system log. -x options cause to display launched executable on system. Aureport work with auditd so auditd must be installed an running on a system. Tested on CentOS / Debian

Find corrupted jpeg image files
Finds all corrupted jpeg files in current directory and its subdirectories. Displays the error or warning found. The jpeginfo is part of the jpeginfo package in debian. Should you wish to only get corrupted filenames, use cut to extract them : $ find ./ -name *jpg -exec jpeginfo -c {} \; | grep -E "WARNING|ERROR" | cut -d " " -f 1

Reduce PDF size

Check if a remote port is up using dnstools.com (i.e. from behind a firewall/proxy)
Shell function; returns 0 if the port is up, 1 otherwise (check $? after executing). First parameter: IP address/hostname Second parameter: port number There is no error checking for the input parameters.

Google Spell Checker
I took matthewbauer's cool one-liner and rewrote it as a shell function that returns all the suggestions or outputs "OK" if it doesn't find anything wrong. It should work on ksh, zsh, and bash. Users that don't have tee can leave that part off like this: $spellcheck(){ typeset y=$@;curl -sd "$y" https://google.com/tbproxy/spell|sed -n '/s="[1-9]"/{s/]*>/ /g;s/\t/ /g;s/ *\(.*\)/Suggestions: \1\n/g;p}';}

Convert & rename all filenames to lower case


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