Commands by frame45 (1)

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Make a dedicated folder for each zip file
${f%*.zip} strips off the extension from zip filenames

Watch the progress of 'dd'
Only slightly different than previous commands. The benefit is that your "watch" should die when the dd command has completed. (Of course this would depend on /proc being available)

Convert files from DOS line endings to UNIX line endings
This method will also convert mac line endings.

ssh autocomplete based on ~/.ssh/config
I use this in my bashrc to expand hosts defined in ~/.ssh/config: function _ssh_completion() { perl -ne 'print "$1 " if /^Host (.+)$/' ~/.ssh/config } complete -W "$(_ssh_completion)" ssh Here's a great article on how to setup your own ~/.ssh/config: http://blogs.perl.org/users/smylers/2011/08/ssh-productivity-tips.html

Limit the transfer rate of a pipe with pv
-L RATE, --rate-limit RATE Limit the transfer to a maximum of RATE bytes per second. A suffix of "k", "m", "g", or "t" can be added to denote kilobytes (*1024), megabytes, and so on. It must be an integer.

Dump bash command history of an active shell user.

Connect to TCP port 5000, transfer data and close connexion.
With no '-q 0' switch, nc simply waits, and whatever awaits the data hangs.

Keep track of diff progress
You're running a program that reads LOTS of files and takes a long time. But it doesn't tell you about its progress. First, run a command in the background, e.g. $ find /usr/share/doc -type f -exec cat {} + > output_file.txt Then run the watch command. "watch -d" highlights the changes as they happen In bash: $! is the process id (pid) of the last command run in the background. You can change this to $(pidof my_command) to watch something in particular.

Recursively remove all empty directories

Printable random characters
Reads psuedorandom bytes from /dev/urandom, filtering out non-printable ones. Other character classes can be used, such as [:alpha:], [:digit:] and [:alnum:]. To get a string of 10 lowercase letters: $ tr -dc '[:lower:]' < /dev/urandom | head -c 10


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