Commands by goldie (1)

  • 1. No for-loop, but xargs. 2. Append "--" in git-reset HEAD command to deal with filenames contained leading hyphen/minus sign (-). 3. Add "--porcelain" option in git-status command for easy-to-parse format when scripting. 4. Add "--no-run-if-empty" option in xargs command to prevent you run it twice and accidentally reset all staged changes. 5. Use zero byte (NUL character) as line terminator instead of newline (\n) to make it more robust to deal with filename with whitespaces. pipe#1: git-status. pipe#2: Use "grep" to filter out "non-added" files. pipe#3: use "sed" to Trim out the leading three characters, reserve the filename. pipe#4: xargs + git-reset... p.s. The "HEAD" in git-reset can be omitted . And, maybe, the third part of this shell pipe (sed) has potential to be enhanced.


    0
    git status --porcelain -z | grep -zZ '^A[ MD] ' | sed -z 's/^...//' | xargs -0 --no-run-if-empty git reset HEAD --
    goldie · 2016-01-24 16:20:08 0

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