Commands by gtcom (1)

  • You can actually do the same thing with a combination of head and tail. For example, in a file of four lines, if you just want the middle two lines: head -n3 sample.txt | tail -n2 Line 1 --\ Line 2 } These three lines are selected by head -n3, Line 3 --/ this feeds the following filtered list to tail: Line 4 Line 1 Line 2 \___ These two lines are filtered by tail -n2, Line 3 / This results in: Line 2 Line 3 being printed to screen (or wherever you redirect it).


    0
    head -n1 sample.txt | tail -n1
    gtcom · 2011-06-14 17:45:04 0

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