Commands by hooobs (3)

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Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Get your outgoing IP address

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

list files recursively by size

Clean way of re-running bash startup scripts.
This replaces the current bash session with a new bash session, run as an interactive non-login shell... useful if you have changed /etc/bash.bashrc, or ~/.bashrc If you have changed a startup script for login shells, use $ exec bash -l Suitable for re-running /etc/profile, ~/.bash_login and ~/.profile. edit: chinmaya points out that $ env - HOME=$HOME TERM=$TERM bash -s "exec bash -l" will clear any shell variables which have been set... since this verges on unwieldy, might want to use $ alias bash_restart='env - HOME=$HOME TERM=$TERM bash -s "exec bash -l"'

BASH: Print shell variable into AWK

Check if the Debian package was used since its installation/upgrade.
This script compares the modification date of /var/lib/dpkg/info/${package}.list and all the files mentioned there. It could be wrong on noatime partitions. Here is non-oneliner: #!/bin/sh package=$1; list=/var/lib/dpkg/info/${package}.list; inst=$(stat "$list" -c %X); cat $list | ( while read file; do if [ -f "$file" ]; then acc=$(stat "$file" -c %X); if [ $inst -lt $acc ]; then echo used $file exit 0 fi; fi; done exit 1 )

worse alternative to
worse alternative to ctrl+r: grep the history removing duplicates without sorting (case insensitive search).

Disable the ping response
It really disables all ICMP responses not only the ping one. If you want to enable it you can use: $ sudo -s "echo 0 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/icmp_echo_ignore_all"

Add line number count as C-style comments
I often find the need to number enumerations and other lists when programming. With this command, create a new file called 'inputfile' with the text you want to number. Paste the contents of 'outputfile' back into your source file and fix the tabbing if necessary. You can also change this to output hex numbering by changing the "%02d" to "%02x". If you need to start at 0 replace "NR" with "NR-1". I adapted this from http://osxdaily.com/2010/05/20/easily-add-line-numbers-to-a-text-file/.


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