Commands by jdecuyper (2)

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Don't spam root. Log your cronjob output to syslog
This command will log the output of your simple cronjobs to syslog, and syslog will take it from there. Works great for monitoring scripts which only produce simple output. Advantages: * This can be used by regular users, without modifying system files like /etc/syslog.conf * Reduce cron spam to [email protected] (Please stop spaming the sysadmins) * Uses common tools like syslog (and logrotate) so that you don't need to maintain yet another krufty logfile. * Still ensures that the output is logged somewhere, for posterity. Perhaps it's stored the secure, central syslog server, for example. * Seems to work fine on Ubuntu, CentOS, FreeBSD & MacOSX

Swap the two last arguments of the current command line
Say you just typed a long command like this: $ rsync -navupogz --delete /long/path/to/dir_a /very/long/path/to/dir_b but you really want to sync dir_b to dir_a. Instead of rewriting all the command line, just type followed by , and your command line will read $ rsync -navupogz --delete /very/long/path/to/dir_b /long/path/to/dir_a

save stderr only to a file
taken from http://www.unix.com/shell-programming-scripting/158311-how-tee-stderr.html " What does it mean? The redirection operator n>&m makes file descriptor n to be a copy of file descriptor m. So, whe are: - Opening a new file descriptor, 3, that is a copy of file descriptor 1, the standard output; - Making file descriptor 1 a copy of file descriptor 2, the standard error output; - Making file descriptor 2 to be a copy of file descriptor 3 (the "backup" of the standard output) in a short: we swapped the standard output and the standard error output. "

Find the process you are looking for minus the grepped one
faster ;) but your idea is really cool

List the CPU model name
Information for only one core.

Finding all files on local file system with SUID and SGID set

Transfer a file to multiple hosts over ssh
You can push files to up to 32 servers at once assuming ssh keys are in place. Great tool, it is part of the pssh suite.

ls -hog --> a more compact ls -l
I often deal with long file names and the 'ls -l' command leaves very little room for file names. An alternative is to use the -h -o and -g flags (or together, -hog). * The -h flag produces human-readable file size (e.g. 91K instead of 92728) * The -o suppresses the owner column * The -g suppresses the group column Since I use to alias ll='ls -l', I now do alias ll='ls -hog'

Top 30 History
Top 30 History Command line with histogram display

Find the cover image for an album
This bash function uses albumart.org to find the cover for an album. It returns an amazon.com url to the image. Usage: albumart [artist] [album] These arguments can be reversed and if the album name is distinct enough, it may be possible to omit the artist. The command can be extended with wget to automatically download the matching image like this: $ albumart(){ local x y="[email protected]";x=$(awk '/View larger image/{gsub(/^.*largeImagePopup\(.|., .*$/,"");print;exit}'


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