Commands by knathan54 (1)

  • whereis (1) - locate the binary, source, and manual page files for a command Not actually better, just expanded a bit. The "whereis" command has the following output: whereis gcc gcc: /usr/bin/gcc /usr/lib/gcc /usr/bin/X11/gcc /usr/share/man/man1/gcc.1.gz therefore the 'ls' error on first line, which could be eliminated with a little extra work. Show Sample Output


    0
    ls -l `whereis gcc`
    knathan54 · 2011-11-15 19:45:08 0

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