Commands by kureikain (4)

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Convert unix timestamp to date

a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.

return the latest kernel version from a Satellite / Spacewalk server software channel

Resize A Mounted EXT3 File System
Live extension of an ext3 file system on logical volume $v by 200GB without the need to unmount/remount. Requires that you have 1) a version of resize2fs that contains code merged from ext2online, and 2) kernel support for online resizing. (e.g. RHEL 5)

Show current pathname in title of terminal
This helps to keep track of what is going on when you have several tabs open in your terminal. The title automatically changes when you change directories.

repeat a command every one second
Short method of "while x=0; do foo ; sleep 1 ; done"

Show changed files, ignoring permission, date and whitespace changes
Only shows files with actual changes to text (excluding whitespace). Useful if you've messed up permissions or transferred in files from windows or something like that, so that you can get a list of changed files, and clean up the rest.

Execute a command on logout
Execute a command on shell logout,and run it until is finished,then shell is closed.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

String to binary
Cool but useless.


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