Commands by lowbatteries (1)

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Execute a command on multiple hosts in parallel
Ssh to host1, host2, and host3, executing on each host and saving the output in {host}.log. I don't have the 'parallel' command installed, otherwise it sounds interesting and less cryptic.

colorize your svn diff
Will colorize your svn diff.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Lists all listening ports together with the PID of the associated process
Lists all opened sockets (not only listeners), no DNS resolution (so it's fast), the process id and the user holding the socket. Previous samples were limiting to TCP too, this also lists UDP listeners.

Does a traceroute. Lookup and display the network or AS names and AS numbers.
From the man page. lft ? display the route packets take to a network host/socket using one of several layer-4 protocols and methods; optionally show heuristic network information in transitu -A Enable lookup and display of of AS (autonomous system) numbers (e.g., [1]). This option queries one of several whois servers (see options 'C' and 'r') in order to ascertain the origin ASN of the IP address in question. By default, LFT uses the pWhoIs service whose ASN data tends to be more accurate and more timely than using the RADB as it is derived from the Internet's global routing table. -N Enable lookup and display of network or AS names (e.g., [GNTY-NETBLK-4]). This option queries Prefix WhoIs, RIPE NCC, or the RADB (as requested). In the case of Prefix WhoIs or RADB, the network name is displayed. In the case of RIPE NCC, the AS name is displayed.

Text graphing ping output filter
Nasty perl one-liner that provides a sparkline of ping times. If you want a different history than the last 30, just put that value in. It (ab)uses unicode to draw the bars, inspired by https://github.com/joemiller/spark-ping . It's not the most bug-free piece of code, but what it lacks in robustness it makes up for in capability. :) If anyone has any ideas on how to make it more compact or better, I'd love to hear them. I included a ping to google in the command just as an example (and burned up 10 chars doing it!). You should use it with: $ ping example.com | $SPARKLINE_PING_COMMAND

Backup a file with a date-time stamp
1. you don't need to prepend the year with 20 - just use Y instead of y 2. you may want to make your function a bit more secure: buf () { cp ${1?filename not specified}{,$(date +%Y%m%d_%H%M%S)}; }

full path listing in /directory/path/* of javascript files.
file listing in /directory/path/* of specific files such as javascript(js) .

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Find and remove core files


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