Commands by mariusz (5)

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Find all files that have nasty names
Get a list of file names that may cause problems (eg being served on a webserver, typing a URL on a mobile, etc)

Share a terminal screen with others
If you enable multiuser, then you can permit others to share your screen session. The following conditions apply: 1. screen must be suid root; 2. "multiuser on" must be configured in ~/.screenrc; 3. control the others user(s) access with "aclchg": # ----- from ~/.screenrc-users ----- aclchg someuser +rx "#?" #enable r/o access to "someuser" aclchg someuser -x "#,at,aclchg,acladd,acldel,quit" # don't allow these aclchg otheruser +rwx "#?" # enable r/w access to "otheruser" aclchg otheruser -x "#,at,aclchg,acladd,acldel,quit" # don't allow them to use these commands # ----- After doing this (once), you start your session with: $ screen Then, the other user can join your terminal session(s) with youruserid: $ screen -r youruserid/ Note: the trailing "/" is required. Multiple users can share the same screen simultaneously, each with independent access controlled precisely with "aclchg" in the ~/.screenrc file. I use the following setup: # ~/.screenrc-base # default screenrc on any host source $HOME/.screenrc-base source $HOME/.screenrc-$HOST source $HOME/.screenrc-users # ----- Then, the base configurations are in ~/.screenrc-base; the host-specific configurations are in ~/.screenrc-$HOST, and the user configurations are in ~/.screenrc-users. The host-specific .screenrc file might contain some host-specific screen commands; e.g.: # ~/.screen-myhost # ----- screen -t 'anywhere' /bin/tcsh screen -t 'anywhere1' /bin/tcsh # ---- The .screenrc-base contains: # ~/.screenrc-base ## I find typing ^a (Control-a) awkward. So I set the escape key to CTRL-j instead of a. escape ^Jj termcapinfo xterm* [email protected]:[email protected]: autodetach on zombie kr verbose on multiuser on

Get your external IP address if your machine has a DNS entry
Using DynDNS or a similar service not only allows access to your home machine from outside without needing to know what IP the ISP has assigned to it but it also comes in handy if you want to know your external IP address. The only purpose of the sed command is to remove the leading "host.na.me has address " part from the output. If you don't need to discard it you can simply use $ host $HOSTNAME

Check your bash shell for vulnerability to the ShellShock exploit
If this command prints 'x' then your shell is vulnerable. Null output confirms that you are protected. Further reading: http://allanmcrae.com/2014/09/shellshock-and-arch-linux/

using tee to echo to a system file with sudo privileges
We sometimes need to change kernel parameters by echoing the file . This needs root privilege and if we do it using sudo like this , it fails $ sudo echo ondemand > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_governor -bash: /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_governor: Permission denied We can achieve this with the tee command by just doing sudo without logging as root user http://www.zaman4linux.in/2010/09/using-tee-to-echo-to-system-file-with.html

Open in TextMate Sidebar files (recursively) with names matching REGEX_A and not matching REGEX_B
This does the following: 1 - Search recursively for files whose names match REGEX_A 2 - From this list exclude files whose names match REGEX_B 3 - Open this as a group in textmate (in the sidebar) And now you can use Command+Shift+F to use textmate own find and replace on this particular group of files. For advanced regex in the first expression you can use -regextype posix-egrep like this: mate - `find * -type f -regextype posix-egrep -regex 'REGEX_A' | grep -v -E 'REGEX_B'` Warning: this is not ment to open files or folders with space os special characters in the filename. If anyone knows a solution to that, tell me so I can fix the line.

Simulate typing

show the date every rpm was installed
the newest rpms are at the top; individual packages can also be queried this way: rpm --last -q package

Send your terminfo to another machine
I frequently use this trick to send my terminal settings to HPUX and older RHEL systems. This is due to the fact that terminfo support for rxvt-unicode (my preferred terminal app) does not exist on many older Linux and Unices.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.


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