Commands by mariusz (5)

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All what exists in dir B and not in dir A will be copied from dir B to new or existing dir C
Assumed dir A, B, C are subdirs of the current dir Exact syntax of the command is: rsync -v -r --size-only --compare-dest=/path_to_A/A/ /path_to_B/B/ /path_to_C/C/ (do not omit end-slashes, since that would copy only the names and not the contents of subdirs of dir B to dir C) You can replace --size-only with --checksum for more thorough file differences validation Useful switch: -n, --dry-run perform a trial run with no changes made

Get IP address from domain

Given process ID print its environment variables

keep a log of the active windows
This logs the titles of the active windows, thus you can monitor what you have done during which times. (it is not hard to also log the executable name, but then it is gets too long)

Live stream a remote audio device over ssh using only ffmpeg
Change parameter 'plughw:0,0' in accordance with your audio device. To learn 'plughw' option, type the command aplay -l.

Prints per-line contribution per author for a GIT repository
Figures out total line contribution per author for an entire GIT repo. Includes binary files, which kind of mess up the true count. If crashes or takes too long, mess with the ls-file option at the start: git ls-files -x "*pdf" -x "*psd" -x "*tif" to remove really random binary files git ls-files "*.py" "*.html" "*.css" to only include specific file types Based off my original SVN version: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/2787/prints-total-line-count-contribution-per-user-for-an-svn-repository

copy timestamps of files from one location to another - useful when file contents are already synced but timestamps are wrong.
Sometimes when copying files from one place to another, the timestamps get lost. Maybe you forgot to add a flag to preserve timestamps in your copy command. You're sure the files are exactly the same in both locations, but the timestamps of the files in the new home are wrong and you need them to match the source. Using this command, you will get a shell script (/tmp/retime.sh) than you can move to the new location and just execute - it will change the timestamps on all the files and directories to their previous values. Make sure you're in the right directory when you launch it, otherwise all the touch commands will create new zero-length files with those names. Since find's output includes "." it will also change the timestamp of the current directory. Ideally rsync would be the way to handle this - since it only sends changes by default, there would be relatively little network traffic resulting. But rsync has to read the entire file contents on both sides to be sure no bytes have changed, potentially causing a huge amount of local disk I/O on each side. This could be a problem if your files are large. My approach avoids all the comparison I/O. I've seen comments that rsync with the "--size-only" and "--times" options should do this also, but it didn't seem to do what I wanted in my test. With my approach you can review/edit the output commands before running them, so you can tell exactly what will happen. The "tee" command both displays the output on the screen for your review, AND saves it to the file /tmp/retime.sh. Credit: got this idea from Stone's answer at http://serverfault.com/questions/344731/rsync-copying-over-timestamps-only?rq=1, and combined it into one line.

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Display 16 largest installed RPMs in size order, largest first
Interesting to see which packages are larger than the kernel package. Useful to understand which RPMs might be candidates to remove if drive space is restricted.

Push your present working directory to a stack that you can pop later
If are a Bash user and you are in a directory and need to go else where for a while but don't want to lose where you were, use pushd instead of cd. cd /home/complicated/path/.I/dont/want/to/forget pushd /tmp cd thing/in/tmp popd (returns you to /home/complicated/path/.I/dont/want/to/forget)


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