Commands by nutria (4)

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Rename duplicates from MusicBrainz Picard
Renames duplicates from MusicBrainz Picard, so you get the latest copy and not a bunch of duplicates.

Simple XML tag extract with sed
Limited, but useful construct to extract text embedded in XML tags. This will only work if bar is all on one line. If nobody posts an alternative for the multiline sed version, I'll figure it out later...

Make a dedicated folder for each zip file
${f%*.zip} strips off the extension from zip filenames

processes per user counter
enumerates the number of processes for each user. ps BSD format is used here , for standard Unix format use : ps -eLf |awk '{$1} {++P[$1]} END {for(a in P) if (a !="UID") print a,P[a]}'

Rename files in batch

reclaim your window titlebars (in ubuntu lucid)

Random Futurama quote
Random Futurama quote from http://cubemonkey.net/quotes/. Change the quote= to change the quote source.

add files to existing growable DVD using growisofs
replace "directory name with files to add to DVD" with actual directory containing files you want to add to growable DVD

One liner to parse all epubs in a directory and use the calibre ebook-convert utility to convert them to mobi format
all ebook-convert -options are optional. all you really need to pass ebook-convert is the incoming and outgoing names, with extensions. Has been tested on Ubuntu 10.10

Using tput to save, clear and restore the terminal contents
Very useful for interactive scripts where you would like to return the terminal contents to its original state before the script was run. This would be similar to how vi exits and returns you to your original terminal screen. Save and clear the terminal contents with: $tput smcup Execute some commands, then restore the saved terminal contents with: $tput rmcup


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