Commands by pkufranky (3)

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Change display resolution
-s must be a valid resolution. You can get a list of valid (and supported) resolutions via `xrandr`.

grep (or anything else) many files with multiprocessor power
Parallel does not suffer from the risk of mixing of output that xargs suffers from. -j+0 will run as many jobs in parallel as you have cores. With parallel you only need -0 (and -print0) if your filenames contain a '\n'. Parallel is from https://savannah.nongnu.org/projects/parallel/

Show LAN IP with ip(8)
$ ip address show | grep eth0 | sed '1d' | awk '{print $2}' does the same, but shows network-prefix.

Watch active calls on an Asterisk PBX

Copy with progress

Listen Digitally Imported Radio from CLI (without premium!)
This commands does just two things: fakes user agent (the one was taken from recent Android app) and sends the (possibly) listener ID (it can be any - I put "1" here because it works like a charm - after the name of stream ?1 as you can see). Look for the list of stations here: http://pub7.di.fm Or here: https://goo.gl/pdhhpQ Best regards, sxiii :)

Print all fields in a file/output from field N to the end of the line

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Sort specific lines while editing within vi
Sort lines within vi editor. In this example sort lines 33-61 and lines 4-9 asciibetically.

Save your open windows to a file so they can be opened after you restart
This will save your open windows to a file (~/.windows). To start those applications: $ cat ~/.windows | while read line; do $line &; done Should work on any EWMH/NetWM compatible X Window Manager. If you use DWM or another Window Manager not using EWMH or NetWM try this: $ xwininfo -root -children | grep '^ ' | grep -v children | grep -v '' | sed -n 's/^ *\(0x[0-9a-f]*\) .*/\1/p' | uniq | while read line; do xprop -id $line _NET_WM_PID | sed -n 's/.* = \([0-9]*\)$/\1/p'; done | uniq -u | grep -v '^$' | while read line; do ps -o cmd= $line; done > ~/.windows


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