Commands by tmsh (5)

  • Personally, I save this in a one line script called ~/bin/sci: #!/bin/bash for pid in `screen -ls | grep -v $STY | grep tached | awk '{print $1;}' | perl -nle '$_ =~ /^(\d+)/; print $1;'`; do screen -x $pid; done I also use: alias scx='screen -x' alias scl='screen -ls | grep -v $STY'


    0
    for pid in `screen -ls | grep -v $STY | grep tached | awk '{print $1;}' | perl -nle '$_ =~ /^(\d+)/; print $1;'`; do screen -x $pid; done
    tmsh · 2010-06-22 23:06:31 0
  • It's actually really helpful if you've done a lot of replaces in say a header file, and now you want to replace the same text in the source code file.


    0
    In vim: q: && v[cursor movement]y && [paste/edit/save to /tmp/tmp.vim] && move to window to modify && :so /tmp/tmp.vim
    tmsh · 2010-05-12 03:03:40 2
  • Because entering ':' requires that you press shift, sometimes common command-line / mini-buffer commands will be capitalized by accident. Show Sample Output


    1
    Create aliases for common vim minibuffer/cmd typos
    tmsh · 2009-12-28 20:58:29 0
  • I don't know if you've used sqsh before. But it has a handy feature that allows you to switch into vim to complete editing of whatever complicated SQL statement you are trying to run. But I got to thinking -- why doesn't bash have that? Well, it does. It's called '|'! Jk. Seriously, I'm pretty sure this flow of commands will revolutionize how I administer files. And b/c everything is a file on *nx based distros, well, it's handy. First, if your ls is aliased to ls --color=auto, then create another alias in your .bashrc: alias lsp='ls --color=none' Now, let's say you want to rename all files that begin with the prefix 'ras' to files that begin with a 'raster' prefix. You could do it with some bash substitution. But who remembers that? I remember vim macros because I can remember to press 'qa' and how to move around in vim. Plus, it's more incremental. You can check things along the way. That is the secret to development and probably the universe. So type something like: lsp | grep ras Are those all the files you need to move? If not, modify and re-grep. If so, pipe it to vim. lsp | grep ras | vim - Now run your vim macros to modify the first line. Assuming you use 'w' and 'b' to move around, etc., it should work for all lines. Hold down '@@', etc., until your list of files has been modified from ras_a.h ras_a.cpp ras_b.h ras_b.cpp to: mv ras_a.h raster_a.h mv ras_a.cpp raster_a.cpp mv ras_b.h raster_b.h mv ras_b.h raster_b.cpp then run :%!bash then run :q! then be like, whaaaaa? as you realize your workflow got a little more continuous. maybe. YMMV.


    -3
    vim -
    tmsh · 2009-11-10 22:25:36 9
  • Resets the scroll parameter to the default (half the rows in the current window). The scroll parameter can be inadvertently set to 1, e..g., if you type '1 Ctrl-D' or '1 Ctrl-U' in normal mode.


    1
    :set scroll=0
    tmsh · 2009-10-10 07:38:27 0

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List all files/folders in working directory with their total size in Megabytes

Print every Nth line
Sometimes commands give you too much feedback. Perhaps 1/100th might be enough. If so, every() is for you. $ my_verbose_command | every 100 will print every 100th line of output. Specifically, it will print lines 100, 200, 300, etc If you use a negative argument it will print the *first* of a block, $ my_verbose_command | every -100 It will print lines 1, 101, 201, 301, etc The function wraps up this useful sed snippet: $ ... | sed -n '0~100p' don't print anything by default $ sed -n starting at line 0, then every hundred lines ( ~100 ) print. $ '0~100p' There's also some bash magic to test if the number is negative: we want character 0, length 1, of variable N. $ ${N:0:1} If it *is* negative, strip off the first character ${N:1} is character 1 onwards (second actual character).

Remove all but One
$ rm-but() { ls -Q | grep -v "$1" | xargs rm -r ; } Add this to your .bashrc file. Then whenever you need to remove all files/directories but one from present working directory. Run: $ rm-but Notes: 1. This doesn't affect the hidden files. 2. Argument is actually as string. And all files/directories having this string in there name are left untouched.

Download an entire static website to your local machine
Very nice command when you want to download a site locally to your machine, including images, css and javascript

Change the homepage of Firefox
This command modifies the preferences file of Firefox that is located in .mozilla/firefox/*.default/prefs.js. It edits the file with sed and the -i option. Then it searches the string "browser.startup.homepage", and the string next to it (second string). Finally, it replaces the second string with the new homepage, that is http://sliceoflinux.com in the example. It doesn't work if you haven't set any homepage.

Extract the contents of an RPM package to your current directory without installing them.
This assumes you have the 'rpm', 'rpm2cpio' and 'cpio' packages installed. This will extract the contents of the RPM package to your current directory. This is useful for working with the files that the package provides without installing the package on your system. Might be useful to create a temporary directory to hold the packages before running the extraction: $ mkdir /tmp/new-package/; cd /tmp/new-package

Find the package that installed a command

Exclude inserting a table from a sql import
Starting with a large MySQL dump file (*.sql) remove any lines that have inserts for the specified table. Sometimes one or two tables are very large and uneeded, eg. log tables. To exclude multiple tables you can get fancy with sed, or just run the command again on subsequently generated files.

See entire packet payload using tcpdump.
This command will show you the entire payload of a packet. The final "s" increases the snaplength, grabbing the whole packet.

Convert a mp3 file to m4a
I use this to convert mp3 files to m4a files that can be used as ringtones on the iPhone. I've documented the process here: http://www.control-d.com/?p=60


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