Commands by unixmonkey365 (6)

  • I wasted two hours reading the sox documentation and searching on the web for the format of some obscure fscking sound sample, and then finally came up with this. This plays only the first three seconds of your unknown formatted sound file using every one of sox's built-in filetypes. If you don't get an exact match, you may get close. . I could not fit every single type in and keep it under 127 characters, so you will have to replace "..." with the full list obtainable by `$ sox --help` (or try `Show sample output`) . note: /usr/bin/play should be linked to sox on most systems. Show Sample Output


    1
    for x in 8svx aif aifc aiff aiffc ... wv wve xa xi ; do echo $x ; play -q -t $x soundfile trim 0 3 ; done
    unixmonkey365 · 2011-12-09 00:23:45 7
  • This is just a phrase I use to help me remember which way is what when using nice (top, renice, etc.), and not a command, (unless you really want this in your .bash_history to help remind you.) I was using the command `man nice ` way too much just to look up which way is what. This saves 9 keystrokes every time I remember it. Make sure you downvote me if you think mnemonics sux. Otherwise I hope this helps someone else.


    1
    # Negative is Not Nice
    unixmonkey365 · 2011-11-29 19:05:23 6
  • Someone over at Mozilla dot Org probably said, "I know, let's create a super-duper universal replacement for browser cookies that are persistent and even more creepy and then NOT give our browser users the tools they need to monitor, read, block or selectively remove them!" . This will let you see all the DOM object users in all your firefox profiles. Feel free to toss a `| sort -u` on the end to remove dupes. . I highly recommend you treat these as "session cookies" by scripting something that deletes this sqlite database during each firefox start-up. . note: does not do anything for so-called "flash cookies" Show Sample Output


    8
    strings ~/.mozilla/firefox/*/webappsstore.sqlite|grep -Eo "^.+\.:" |rev
    unixmonkey365 · 2011-09-26 15:23:09 10
  • Another function to stick into your .bashrc This spits out the time two minutes in the future, but already formatted for pasting into your crontab file for testing without any thought required on your part. Frequently things don't work the way you expect inside a crontab job, and you probably want to find out now that your $PATH is completely different inside of cron or other global variables aren't defined. So this will generate a date you can use for testing now, and then later you can change it to run at 5:37 am on a Sunday evening. Show Sample Output


    7
    crontest () { date '-d +2 minutes' +'%M %k %d %m *'; }
    unixmonkey365 · 2011-09-16 00:47:24 5
  • cn stands for "Cat Null" . The idea is that sometimes you run across something on maybe a webpage - like commandlinefu - that you want to try out on your terminal. You could put a '#' in and then paste it, but what if it is several lines? . This command will echo the pasted characters to the screen and divert them to the bit bucket. . Put this simple alias in your .bashrc, hit cn, paste away, and hit a ctrl+c or a ctrl+d when you are done to get your prompt back. Show Sample Output


    -3
    alias cn='cat > /dev/null'
    unixmonkey365 · 2011-09-16 00:00:28 7
  • Evoke from the command like as: timeDNS commandlinefu.com . This isn't too terribly practical, but it is a good code example of using subshells to run the queries in parallel and the use of an "anonymous function" (a/k/a "inline group") to group i/o. . I'm assuming you have already defined your local DNS cache as ${local_DNS}, (here, it's 192.168.0.1). . You do need to install `moreutils` to get `sponge`. . If you're willing to wait, a slower version w/o sponge, (and w/o sorting), is this: . DNS () { for x in "192.168.0.1" "208.67.222.222" "208.67.220.220" "198.153.192.1" "198.153.194.1" "156.154.70.1" "156.154.71.1" "8.8.8.8" "8.8.4.4"; do (echo -n "$x "; dig @"$x" "$*"|grep Query) ; done ; } Show Sample Output


    1
    timeDNS () { { for x in "${local_DNS}" "208.67.222.222" "208.67.220.220" "198.153.192.1" "198.153.194.1" "156.154.70.1" "156.154.71.1" "8.8.8.8" "8.8.4.4"; do ({ echo -n "$x "; dig @"$x" "$*"|grep Query ; }|sponge &) done ; } | sort -n -k5 ; }
    unixmonkey365 · 2011-08-18 01:11:53 6

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Stream and copy a video from lan
Requires a listening port on HOST eg. "cat movie.mp4 | nc -l 1356 " (cat movie.mp4 | nc -l PORT) Useful if you're impatient and want to watch a movie immediately and download it at the same time without using extra bandwidth. You can't seek (it'll crash and kill the stream) but you can pause it.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Bare Metal IRC Client
Uses the extremely cool utilities netcat and expect. "expect" logs in & monitors for server PING checks. When a PING is received it sends the PONG needed to stay connected. IRC commands to try: HELP, TIME, MOTD, JOIN and PRIVMSG The "/" in front of IRC commands are not needed, e.g. type JOIN #mygroup Learn about expect: http://tldp.org/LDP/LGNET/issue48/fisher.html The sample output shows snippets from an actual IRC session. Please click UP button if you like it!

pimp text output e.g. "Linux rocks!" to look nice

Get a funny one-liner from www.onelinerz.net
Put this command in .bashrc and every time you open a new terminal a random quote will be downloaded and printed from onelinerz.net. By altering the URL in the w3m statement you can change the output: 1 to 10 lines - http://www.onelinerz.net/random-one-liners/(number)/ 20 newest lines - http://www.onelinerz.net/latest-one-liners/ Top 10 lines - http://www.onelinerz.net/top-100-funny-one-liners/ Top 10 lines are updated daily.

The command used by applications in OS X to determine whether a plist is "good". from Ed Marczak.
The check an entire folder is a one-liner: plutil -lint * | grep -v OK$ from Ed Marczak

Convert a videos audio track to ogg vorbis.
Assumes you have ffmpeg and oggenc. Similar to other scripts here, but this time outputting to Ogg Vorbis. I added the variable assignment for a nice output name. This is part of an interactive bash script I have with a few little multimedia tasks in it. http://www.dward.us/software/VSAK.sh

Temporarily ignore mismatched SSH host key
This command will bypass checking the host key of the target server against the local known_hosts file. When you SSH to a server whose host key does not match the one stored in your local machine's known_hosts file, you'll get a error like " WARNING: REMOTE HOST IDENTIFICATION HAS CHANGED!" that indicates a key mismatch. If you know the key has legitimately changed (like the server was reinstalled), a permanent solution is to remove the stored key for that server in known_hosts. However, there are some occasions where you may not want to make the permanent change. For example, you've done some port-forwarding trickery with ssh -R or ssh -L, and are doing ssh user@localhost to connect over the port-forwarding to some other machine (not actually your localhost). Since this is usually temporary, you probably don't want to change the known_hosts file. This command is useful for those situations. Credit: Command found at http://linuxcommando.blogspot.com/2008/10/how-to-disable-ssh-host-key-checking.html. Further discussion of how it works is there also. Note this is a bit different than command #5307 - with that one you will still be prompted to store the unrecognized key, whereas this one won't prompt you for the key at all.

watch the previous command
If you just executed some long command, like "ps -aefww | grep -i [m]yProcess", and if you don't want to retype it or cycle backwards in history and waste time quoting it, then you can use history substitution.

view the system console remotely
This will view the console and assumes the screen is 80 characters wide. Use /dev/vcs2 for the next virtual console.. etc.


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