Commands by xro (4)

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concatenate avi files
concatenates avi files

Benchmark SQL Query
Benchmark a SQL query against MySQL Server. The example runs the query 10 times, and you get the average runtime in the output. To ensure that the query does not get cached, use `RESET QUERY CACHE;` on top in the query file.

LIst svn commits by user for a date range
Outputs a quick summary of the svn commits for a user over a date range with the detail revision logs including comments and files affected. Useful for searching for a particular change or reporting by user.

add static arp entry to default gateway, arp poison protection

VI config to save files with +x when a shebang is found on line 1
Add this to .vimrc to automatically give scripts with a shebang (e.g., #!/usr/bin/perl) executable permissions when saving. Found @ http://stackoverflow.com/questions/817060/creating-executable-files-in-linux/817522#817522

Google Translate
Usage: $ translate Example: $ translate hello en es See this for a list of language codes: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ISO_639-1_codes

List mp3 files with less than 320 kbps bitrate.

Yet Another Large Screen Clock

run a command whenever a file is touched
This is useful if you'd like to see the output of a script while you edit it. Each time you save the file the command is executed. I thought for sure something like this already exists - and it probably does. I'm on an older system and tend to be missing some useful things. Examples: $ ontouchdo yourscript 'clear; yourscript somefiletoparse' Edit yourscript in a separate window and see new results each time you save. $ ontouchdo crufty.html 'clear; xmllint --noout crufty.html 2>&1 | head' Keep editing krufty.html until the xmllint window is empty. Note: Mac/bsd users should use stat -f%m. If you don't have stat, you can use perl -e '$f=shift; @s=stat($f); print "$s[9]\n";' $1

Instead of saying RTFM!


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