Commands tagged nginx (5)

  • Nginx (and other webservers like Apache) can be awkward to trace. They run as root, then switch to another user once they're ready to serve web pages. They also have a "master" process and multiple worker processes. The given command finds the process IDs of all Nginx processes, joins them together with a comma, then traces all of them at once with "sudo strace." System trace output can be overwhelming, so we only capture "networking" output. TIP: to kill this complex strace, do "sudo killall strace". Compare with a similar command: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/11918/easily-strace-all-your-apache-processes Show Sample Output


    1
    sudo strace -e trace=network -p `pidof nginx | sed -e 's/ /,/g'`
    shavenwarthog · 2016-01-28 18:48:16 0

  • 2
    openssl req -nodes -newkey rsa:2048 -keyout server.key -out server.csr -subj "/C=BR/ST=State/L=City/O=Company Inc./OU=IT/CN=domain.com"
    sistematico · 2015-04-17 10:04:18 0
  • This command counts the number of blocked NGINX processes every 2 seconds and shows the last 22 measurements You should have at least the number of cpu's in a non-blocked state. The command up to the first ; truncates the log file. Show Sample Output


    -2
    > /tmp/psup.log; watch "ps up $(pgrep -d, -x nginx) | grep -v STAT | awk '{print $8}' | grep -c [ZUTD] >> /tmp/psup.log; tail -n 22 /tmp/psup.log"
    donnoman · 2011-03-16 17:49:23 0
  • I wrote this script to speed up Nginx configs. This (long) one liner can be run via BASH. You will see that we set a variable in bash called 'foo' and the streamline editor (sed) finds 'bar' in 'foo.conf' next it writes that output to a temp file (foo.temp) and removes the first 5 lines (that aren't needed in this case) & lastly it moves (overwrites) foo.temp to foo.conf Show Sample Output


    0
    variable="foo" && sed 's/bar/'$variable'/g' $variable.conf >> $variable.temp && sed '1,5d' $variable.temp && mv $variable.temp $variable.conf
    jdorfman · 2010-07-09 22:12:51 0
  • Taking file with ip ranges, each on it's own line like: cat ipranges.txt 213.87.86.160-213.87.86.193 213.87.87.0-213.87.88.255 91.135.210.0-91.135.210.255 command returns deaggregated ip ranges using ipcalc deaggregate feature like that: 213.87.86.160/27 213.87.86.192/31 213.87.87.0/24 213.87.88.0/24 91.135.210.0/24 Useful for configuring nginx geo module Show Sample Output


    7
    /bin/grep - ipranges.txt | while read line; do ipcalc $line ; done | grep -v deag
    tf8 · 2010-04-20 21:13:00 0

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