Commands tagged nginx (7)

  • Taking file with ip ranges, each on it's own line like: cat ipranges.txt 213.87.86.160-213.87.86.193 213.87.87.0-213.87.88.255 91.135.210.0-91.135.210.255 command returns deaggregated ip ranges using ipcalc deaggregate feature like that: 213.87.86.160/27 213.87.86.192/31 213.87.87.0/24 213.87.88.0/24 91.135.210.0/24 Useful for configuring nginx geo module Show Sample Output


    7
    /bin/grep - ipranges.txt | while read line; do ipcalc $line ; done | grep -v deag
    tf8 · 2010-04-20 21:13:00 0

  • 2
    openssl req -nodes -newkey rsa:2048 -keyout server.key -out server.csr -subj "/C=BR/ST=State/L=City/O=Company Inc./OU=IT/CN=domain.com"
    sistematico · 2015-04-17 10:04:18 0
  • Nginx (and other webservers like Apache) can be awkward to trace. They run as root, then switch to another user once they're ready to serve web pages. They also have a "master" process and multiple worker processes. The given command finds the process IDs of all Nginx processes, joins them together with a comma, then traces all of them at once with "sudo strace." System trace output can be overwhelming, so we only capture "networking" output. TIP: to kill this complex strace, do "sudo killall strace". Compare with a similar command: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/11918/easily-strace-all-your-apache-processes Show Sample Output


    1
    sudo strace -e trace=network -p `pidof nginx | sed -e 's/ /,/g'`
    shavenwarthog · 2016-01-28 18:48:16 0
  • wget http://nginx.org/download/nginx-1.15.3.tar.gz && tar -xzf 1.15.3.tar.gz && cd nginx-1.15.3 Show Sample Output


    1
    ./configure --help | grep -P "^ +--with-(?!(poll|select))[^=]+(_module( |$)| (module|support)$)" | sed -r 's/((dis|en)able|build) /# /'
    emphazer · 2018-09-14 12:54:06 0
  • I wrote this script to speed up Nginx configs. This (long) one liner can be run via BASH. You will see that we set a variable in bash called 'foo' and the streamline editor (sed) finds 'bar' in 'foo.conf' next it writes that output to a temp file (foo.temp) and removes the first 5 lines (that aren't needed in this case) & lastly it moves (overwrites) foo.temp to foo.conf Show Sample Output


    0
    variable="foo" && sed 's/bar/'$variable'/g' $variable.conf >> $variable.temp && sed '1,5d' $variable.temp && mv $variable.temp $variable.conf
    jdorfman · 2010-07-09 22:12:51 0
  • wait nginx processes. Show Sample Output


    0
    while pgrep nginx;do ;sleep 1;done
    umiyosh · 2014-12-25 06:44:12 2
  • This command counts the number of blocked NGINX processes every 2 seconds and shows the last 22 measurements You should have at least the number of cpu's in a non-blocked state. The command up to the first ; truncates the log file. Show Sample Output


    -2
    > /tmp/psup.log; watch "ps up $(pgrep -d, -x nginx) | grep -v STAT | awk '{print $8}' | grep -c [ZUTD] >> /tmp/psup.log; tail -n 22 /tmp/psup.log"
    donnoman · 2011-03-16 17:49:23 0

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Find the package that installed a command

Display a cool clock on your terminal
This command displays a clock on your terminal which updates the time every second. Press Ctrl-C to exit. A couple of variants: A little bit bigger text: $ watch -t -n1 "date +%T|figlet -f big" You can try other figlet fonts, too. Big sideways characters: $ watch -n 1 -t '/usr/games/banner -w 30 $(date +%M:%S)' This requires a particular version of banner and a 40-line terminal or you can adjust the width ("30" here).

Create a backdoor on a machine to allow remote connection to bash
This will launch a listener on the machine that will wait for a connection on port 1234. When you connect from a remote machine with something like : nc 192.168.0.1 1234 You will have console access to the machine through bash.

Generate a playlist of all the files in the directory, newer first
I use this to generate a playlist with all the podcasts I listen to. Ordered from most recent to older.

List empty any directories

Protect directory from an overzealous rm -rf *
Forces the -i flag on the rm command when using a wildcard delete.

Top ten (or whatever) memory utilizing processes (with children aggregate)
This command loops over all of the processes in a system and creates an associative array in awk with the process name as the key and the sum of the RSS as the value. The associative array has the effect of summing a parent process and all of it's children. It then prints the top ten processes sorted by size.

Rename files in batch

Convert a flv video file to avi using mencoder

Automatically connect to a host with ssh once it is online


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: