Commands tagged iostat (3)

  • blktrace is a block layer IO tracing mechanism which provide detailed information about request queue operations up to user space. blkparse will combine streams of events for various devices on various CPUs, and produce a formatted output the the event information. It take the output of above tool blktrace and convert those information into fency readable form. Show Sample Output


    1
    sudo blktrace -d /dev/sda -o - | blkparse -i -
    emphazer · 2019-07-02 06:13:58 0
  • Shows a constantly updating display of disk IO activity. Two sections are in the output. The first is the IO activity since the machine was booted, the second section is the IO activity in the last second Show Sample Output


    0
    watch -n 1 'iostat -xmd 1 2'
    ryanchapman · 2013-07-06 08:07:32 0
  • This helps quickly get information for each disk that is seemingly having hardware issues.


    -1
    iostat -En $(iostat -en|grep c#t|awk '$2 > 0 {print $NF}')
    unixmonkey28207 · 2011-12-09 15:54:28 0

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Directory bookmarks
pushd and popd are your friends, but sometimes they're just incompatible with the way one works... Two shell functions: bm bookmarkname - "bookmarks" the current directory, just 'cd $BMbookmarkname' to return to it. forget bookmarkname - unsets the 'bookmarkname' variable. It isn't mandatory, they cease to exist when the session ends.

Multi line grep using sed and specifying open/close tags
Working with log files that contains variable length messages wrapped between open and close tags it may be useful to filter the messages upon a keyword. This works fine with GNU sed version 4.2 or higher, so pay attention to some unix distros (solaris, hp-ux, etc.). Linux should be ok.

print file without duplicated lines using awk
This create an array 'a' with wole lines. only one occurrence of each line - Not Get lines ++ !

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Purge configuration files of removed packages on debian based systems
Purge all configuration files of removed packages

create a backup for all directories from current dir
Create backup (.tar.gz) for all first-level directory from current dir.

List the size (in human readable form) of all sub folders from the current location
Tested on MacOS and GNU/Linux. It works in dirs containing files starting with '-'. It runs 'du' only once. It sorts according to size. It treats 1K=1000 (and not 1024)

Duplicate several drives concurrently
If you have some drive imaging to do, you can boot into any liveCD and use a commodity machine. The drives will be written in parallel. To improve efficiency, specify a larger block size in dd: $dd if=/dev/sda bs=64k | tee >(dd of=/dev/sdb bs=64k) | dd of=/dev/sdc bs=64k To image more drives , insert them as additional arguments to tee: $dd if=/dev/sda | tee >(dd of=/dev/sdb) >(dd of=/dev/sdc) >(dd of=/dev/sdd) | dd of=/dev/sde

Execute a command without saving it in the history
Yes, by correctly setting the HIST* variables you can make certain commands not saved in history. But that's complicated and easy to make a mistake. If you set HISTFILE= to blank, nothing in your current shell session will be saved in history. Although this is not a precise answer to the subject, but it's very simple.

cpu info


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