Commands tagged known_hosts (3)

  • This command will bypass checking the host key of the target server against the local known_hosts file. When you SSH to a server whose host key does not match the one stored in your local machine's known_hosts file, you'll get a error like " WARNING: REMOTE HOST IDENTIFICATION HAS CHANGED!" that indicates a key mismatch. If you know the key has legitimately changed (like the server was reinstalled), a permanent solution is to remove the stored key for that server in known_hosts. However, there are some occasions where you may not want to make the permanent change. For example, you've done some port-forwarding trickery with ssh -R or ssh -L, and are doing ssh user@localhost to connect over the port-forwarding to some other machine (not actually your localhost). Since this is usually temporary, you probably don't want to change the known_hosts file. This command is useful for those situations. Credit: Command found at http://linuxcommando.blogspot.com/2008/10/how-to-disable-ssh-host-key-checking.html. Further discussion of how it works is there also. Note this is a bit different than command #5307 - with that one you will still be prompted to store the unrecognized key, whereas this one won't prompt you for the key at all.


    10
    ssh -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no username@host
    dmmst19 · 2012-04-20 01:54:04 2
  • Easily removes line #2 in ~/.ssh/known_hosts. Show Sample Output


    -1
    perl -p -i -e 's/.*\n//g if $.==2' ~/.ssh/known_hosts
    meappy · 2012-01-17 14:11:03 0
  • Quickly remove the conflicting line (key) from current users known_hosts file when there is an SSH host conflict. Very nice when you get tired of writing out full commands. Ideally you would place this into your .bash_profile Usage: rhost [n] Example: rhost 33 (removes line 33 from ~/.ssh/known_hosts) Function assumes the $HOME exists, you could alternatively use "~/.ssh/known_hosts" Mac OSX likes a space for sed -i "$1" d


    -1
    rhost() { if [[ $1 =~ ^[0-9]+$ ]]; then sed -i "$1"d ${HOME}/.ssh/known_hosts; else echo "rhost [n]"; fi }
    lowjax · 2013-08-01 21:10:34 5

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