Commands tagged brainwallet (6)

  • A bitcoin "brainwallet" is a secret passphrase you carry in your brain. The Bitcoin Brainwallet Private Key Base58 Encoder is the third of three functions needed to calculate a bitcoin PRIVATE key from your "brainwallet" passphrase. This base58 encoder uses the obase parameter of the amazing bc utility to convert from ASCII-hex to base58. Tech note: bc inserts line continuation backslashes, but the "read s" command automatically strips them out. I hope that one day base58 will, like base64, be added to the amazing openssl utility. Show Sample Output


    6
    function b58encode () { local b58_lookup_table=({1..9} {A..H} {J..N} {P..Z} {a..k} {m..z}); bc<<<"obase=58;ibase=16;${1^^}"|(read -a s; for b58_index in "${s[@]}" ; do printf %s ${b58_lookup_table[ 10#"$b58_index" ]}; done); }
    nixnax · 2014-02-18 02:29:30 0
  • A bitcoin "brainwallet" is a secret passphrase you carry in the "wallet" of your brain. The Bitcoin Brainwallet Private Key Calculator calculates the standard base58 encoded bitcoin private key from your "brainwallet" passphrase. The private key is the most important bitcoin number. All other numbers can be derived from it. This command uses 3 other functions - all 3 are defined on my user page: 1) brainwallet_exponent() - search for Bitcoin Brainwallet Exponent Calculator 2) brainwallet_checksum() - search for Bitcoin Brainwallet Exponent Calculator 3) b58encode() - search for Bitcoin Brainwallet Base58 Encoder Do make sure you use really strong, unpredictable passphrases (30+ characters)! http:brainwallet.org can be used to check the accuracy of this calculator. Show Sample Output


    6
    (read -r passphrase; b58encode 80$( brainwallet_exponent "$passphrase" )$( brainwallet_checksum "$passphrase" ))
    nixnax · 2014-02-18 02:50:09 1
  • A bitcoin "brainwallet" is a secret passphrase you carry in your brain. The Bitcoin Brainwallet Exponent Calculator is one of three functions needed to calculate the bitcoin PRIVATE key. Roughly, the formula is exponent = sha256 (passphrase) Note that this is a bash function, which means you have to type its name to invoke it. You can check the accuracy of the results here http://brainwallet.org Show Sample Output


    5
    function brainwallet_exponent () { printf %s "$1"|sha256sum|head -c 64; }
    nixnax · 2014-02-18 01:49:09 1
  • A bitcoin "brainwallet" is a secret passphrase you carry in your brain. The Bitcoin Brainwallet Exponent Calculator is the second of three functions needed to calculate a bitcoin PRIVATE key. Roughly, checksum is the first 8 hex digits of sha256(sha256(0x80+sha256(passphrase))) Note that this is a bash function, which means you have to type its name to invoke it Show Sample Output


    5
    function brainwallet_checksum () { (o='openssl sha256 -binary'; p='printf';($p %b "\x80";$p %s "$1"|$o)|$o|sha256sum|cut -b1-8); }
    nixnax · 2014-02-18 02:07:02 2

  • 0
    $ bitgen hex 12312381273918273128937128912c3b1293cb712938cb12983cb192cb1289b3 info
    Label10 · 2019-03-27 21:25:29 2

  • 0
    (read -r passphrase; b58encode 80$( brainwallet_exponent "$passphrase" )$( brainwallet_checksum "$passphrase" ))
    Jacki188 · 2019-09-15 21:31:52 5

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