Commands tagged irc (4)

  • Uses the extremely cool utilities netcat and expect. "expect" logs in & monitors for server PING checks. When a PING is received it sends the PONG needed to stay connected. IRC commands to try: HELP, TIME, MOTD, JOIN and PRIVMSG The "/" in front of IRC commands are not needed, e.g. type JOIN #mygroup Learn about expect: http://tldp.org/LDP/LGNET/issue48/fisher.html The sample output shows snippets from an actual IRC session. Please click UP button if you like it! Show Sample Output


    9
    nik=clf$RANDOM;sr=irc.efnet.org;expect -c "set timeout -1;spawn nc $sr 6666;set send_human {.1 .2 1 .2 1};expect AUTH*\n ;send -h \"user $nik * * :$nik commandlinefu\nnick $nik\n\"; interact -o -re (PING.:)(.*\$) {send \"PONG :\$interact_out(2,string)\"}"
    omap7777 · 2015-03-18 09:10:28 4
  • command | my_irc Pipe whatever you want to this function, it will, if everything goes well, be redirected to a channel or a user on an IRC server. Please note that : - I am not responsible of flood excesses you might provoke. - that function does not reply to PINGs from the server. That's the reason why I first write in a temporary file. Indeed, I don't want to wait for inputs while being connected to the server. However, according to the configuration of the server and the length of your file, you may timeout before finishing. - Concerning the server, the variable content must be on the form "irc.server.org 6667" (or any other port). If you want to make some tests, you can also create a fake IRC server on "localhost 55555" by using netcat -l -p 55555 - Concerning the target, you can choose a channel (beginning with a '#' like "#chan") or a user (like "user") - The other variables have obvious names. Show Sample Output


    1
    function my_irc { tmp=`mktemp`; cat > $tmp; { echo -e "USER $username x x :$ircname\nNICK $nick\nJOIN $target"; while read line; do echo -e "PRIVMSG $target :$line"; done < $tmp; } | nc $server > /dev/null ; rm $tmp; }
    Josay · 2009-06-11 22:14:48 0
  • This awk command prints a histogram of the number of times 'emergency' is the first word in a line, per day, in an irssi (IRC client) log file. Show Sample Output


    0
    awk '/^--- Day changed (.*)/ {st=""; for (i=0;i<ar[date];i++) {st=st"*"} print date" "st; date=$7"-"$5"-"$6} /> emergency/ {ar[date]++} END {st=""; for (i=0;i<ar[date];i++) {st=st"*"}; print date" "st}' #engineyard.log
    menicosia · 2010-02-24 22:54:34 1
  • This awk command prints a histogram of the number of times 'emergency' is the first word in a line, per day, in an irssi (IRC client) log file. Show Sample Output


    -2
    awk '/^--- Day changed (.*)/ {st=""; for (i=0;i<ar[date];i++) {st=st"*"} print date" "st; date=$7"-"$5"-"$6} /> emergency/ {ar[date]++} END {st=""; for (i=0;i<ar[date];i++) {st=st"*"}; print date" "st}' #engineyard.log
    MarcoN · 2010-02-24 23:10:03 0

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