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.inputrc keybinding to wrap current line in inotifytools for instant compile/test-as-you-save-loop
Assuming you've written all of make -j hfst-tokenize && echo doavtter gr?dakursa|./hfst-tokenize --gtd tokeniser-gramcheck-gt-desc.pmhfst and want that to execute every time you :w in vim (or C-xC-s in Emacs), just hit and it'll turn into $ while true; do ( make -j hfst-tokenize && e doavtter gr?dakursa|./hfst-tokenize --gtd tokeniser-gramcheck-gt-desc.pmhfst ); inotifywait -q -e modify -e close_write *; done with the cursor right before the ')'. Hit enter, and it'll run on each save. Requires the package inotify-tools installed.

climagic's New Year's Countdown clock
This is the 140 character long new year's countdown timer that was posted to the climagic account on twitter and identi.ca. There are saner ways of doing this of course, but probably none of those would fit. Uses the figlet command, but of course you can replace figlet with just echo if you want.

Log the current memory statistics frequently to syslog
Uses logger in a while loop to log memory statistics frequently into the local syslog server.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Flush DNS cache in MacOS 10.5

Get your external IP address
Yeah I know it's been up here a million times, but this service is a really clean and nice one. Nothing but your IP address on it. Actually I was to write something like this, and noticed this on appspot... ;)

Convert A USB Cable Into A Smart Home Gadget
An old USB A/B cable is all you need to make your own Smart Home hardware! Cut off and discard the B-portion of the USB cable. On the A side, connect the RED (+) and WHITE (D-) wires via a 1 kiloohm resistor. $Picture: http://imgur.com/dJGVlAU Now plug the cable into a USB port on your Linux computer. Your hardware is ready! Run the above command after changing variable mysms to your personal email-to-SMS gateway info as required by your cellular service provider. The command uses the amazing usbmon tool (see link below) to detect the cable. For the curious, to view the raw usbmon output, run this command: (Also see the sample output) $usbmon -i usb0 How does it work? When the red and white wires are connected (via the 1 kiloohm resistor) the USB hardwere is tricked into thinking that a new USB device is trying to start up. We then use the usbmon utility to capture the host USB events as it tries to talk to the cable. The expect utility watches the usbmon stream and waits for the disconnect text "-2:128" before sending the SMS message. Finally, the sendmail tool is used to email the SMS message to your smartphone via your cellular provider's SMS-to-email gateway. As a result, when the electrical connection between the red and white wire is interrupted, or the USB cable is unplugged from your computer, you get an SMS notification of the disconnect event on your smartphone. Could this be the cheapest smart home gadget ever? What are YOU going to sense with it? Please let me know in the comments and please don't forget to click it up! $ $Links: $ http://www.linuxcertif.com/man/8/usbmon/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB#Pinouts http://imgur.com/dJGVlAU

Add a progress counter to loop (see sample output)
For this hack you need following function: $ finit() { count=$#; current=1; for i in "[email protected]" ; do echo $current $count; echo $i; current=$((current + 1)); done; } and alias: $ alias fnext='read cur total && echo -n "[$cur/$total] " && read' Inspired by CMake progress counters.

Find all files currently open in Vim and/or gVim
Catches .swp, .swo, .swn, etc. If you have access to lsof, it'll give you more compressed output and show you the associated terminals (e.g., pts/5, which you could then use 'w' to figure out where it's originating from): lsof | grep '\.sw.$' If you have swp files turned off, you can do something like: ps x | grep '[g,v]im', but it won't tell you about files open in buffers, via :e [file].

Matrix Style
Same as above but slooooow it down


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