Commands tagged make (7)

  • Uses inotifywait from inotify-tools ( http://wiki.github.com/rvoicilas/inotify-tools/ ), that is compatible only with linux. Usefull when you work with files that have to be compiled.. latex, haml, c..


    15
    while true; do inotifywait -r -e MODIFY dir/ && make; done;
    fain182 · 2010-06-04 17:07:03 0

  • 5
    while inotifywait -r -e MODIFY dir/; do make; done;
    prayer · 2010-06-08 23:34:00 2
  • this oneliner uses make and it's jobserver for parallel execution of your script. The '-j' flag for make defines number of subprocesses to launch, '-f' tells make use stdin instead of Makefile. Also make have neat flag '-l', which "Specifies that no new jobs (commands) should be started if there are others jobs running and the load is at least load (a floating-point number)." Also you can use plain Makefile, for better readability: targets = $(subst .png,.jpg,$(wildcard *.png)) (targets): echo convert $(subst .jpg,.png,$@) $@ all : $(targets)


    5
    echo -n 'targets = $(subst .png,.jpg,$(wildcard *.png))\n$(targets):\n convert $(subst .jpg,.png,$@) $@ \nall : $(targets)' | make -j 4 -f - all
    mechmind · 2010-07-15 07:19:17 1
  • This would allow reference of $(VAR) (if defined) with the value 'foobar' within the Makefile.


    1
    make [target] VAR=foobar
    cifr · 2009-10-12 09:42:30 0
  • Say your dependencies specified in your Makefile (or dates on your source files) is causing 'make' to skip some source-files (that it should not) or on the other other end, if it is causing make to always build some source-files regardless of dates of target, then above command is handy to find out what 'make' thinks of your date v/s target date-wise or what dependencies are in make's view-point. The egrep part removes the extra noise, that you might want to avoid. Show Sample Output


    1
    make -d | egrep --color -i '(considering|older|newer|remake)'
    b_t · 2011-06-03 01:55:08 1
  • on a dpkg managed system this PATTERN will help you generate .deb files from source AND remove all the dev libs you had to install. i hate cluttering up my machine with rouge packages and headers. it would be pretty darn easy on rpm systems as well. i just dont have a rpm managed system to test on right now. NOTE, you sharp ones will notice that it uninstalls the deb you just made! yeah, but the deb is still there to do with it what you want, like re install it. or you can just grep -v after the diff


    0
    dpkg-query -l > 1.lst; sudo apt-get install -y build-essential; ./configure; make; sudo checkinstall -D make install; dpkg-query --list > 2.lst; diff 1.lst 2.lst | grep '^>' | awk '{print $3}' | xargs sudo apt-get remove -y --purge
    danlangford · 2010-06-16 22:06:07 1
  • Will prepend date and time in the following format: dd-mm-yyyy@hh:mm:ss (24hours format) and redirect it to make.out file Show Sample Output


    0
    make -j 2>&1 | while IFS= read -r line; do echo "$(date +"%d-%m-%Y@%T") $line"; done > make.out
    redowk · 2017-03-06 18:14:51 0

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Remote screenshot
Say if you're logged into a remote system via ssh and this system has an x window system, but yet you still want a screen shot of what's going on graphically. This will do it for you. :-)

Socksify any program to avoid restrictive firwalls
Require: - tsocks (deb pkg) - A working SOCKS proxy. It's easy with ssh: $ ssh -N -D localhost:1080 your.home.pc -p 443 - tsocks configuration in your /etc/tsocks.conf (for the previous): server = 127.0.0.1 server_port = 1080

Create a simple video contact sheet using the vcs bash script
Assumes you've downloaded Toni Corvera's vcs script (http://p.outlyer.net/vcs), have it in your PATH, and have installed the script's dependencies. Generates a video contact sheet of 24 thumbnails and 3 thumbnails per column. The bold font and white-on-black color scheme keeps the text readable at the chosen 70% JPEG compression quality, which keeps the file size at a manageable level. You can go even lower with the quality and get a good looking result.

View a file with less, starting at the end of the file
The same as typing 'less filename' then 'G' or '>' or the END key. Comes in handy with shell scripts or aliases: alias weblog='less +G /var/log/httpd/access_log' alias errlog='less +G /var/log/httpd/error_log'

Lines per second in a log file
Another way of counting the line output of tail over 10s not requiring pv. Cut to have the average per second rate : tail -n0 -f access.log>/tmp/tmp.log & sleep 10; kill $! ; wc -l /tmp/tmp.log | cut -c-2 You can also enclose it in a loop and send stderr to /dev/null : while true; do tail -n0 -f access.log>/tmp/tmp.log & sleep 2; kill $! ; wc -l /tmp/tmp.log | cut -c-2; done 2>/dev/null

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Use tee to process a pipe with two or more processes
Tee can be used to split a pipe into multiple streams for one or more process to work it. You can add more " >()" for even more fun.

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