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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!

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Commands tagged strings from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged strings - 13 results
for f in `ls`; do sed -i '/MATCHING STRING/ { s/ORIGINAL/REPLACEMENT/; }' ${f} ; done
2015-05-21 19:37:42
User: krizzo
Functions: sed

Find and replace specific characters in a single line in multiple files with sed.

strings -1 <file>
2012-11-23 11:33:25
User: Testuser_01
Functions: strings

Use this like the cat command with the additional feature to strip out unprintable characters from the input, newlines will stay.

strings /usr/lib/flashplugin-nonfree/libflashplayer.so |grep ^LNX
2012-04-25 10:34:57
User: domicius
Functions: grep strings

This is for Debian, simply change the path if your Flash plugin is installed elsewhere.

echo 474e552773204e6f7420556e697821 | sed -e 's/\(.\{2\}\)/\\\\x\1/g' | xargs echo -e
echo $hex | perl -pe 's/(..)/chr(hex($1))/ge'
seq -s " " -w 3 20
printf "%02u " {3..20}; echo
2009-09-18 18:48:41
User: Escher
Functions: printf
Tags: bash strings

emulates bash4's "echo {03..20}"

Uses bash3 builtin function printf

for i in {0..1}{0..9}; do echo $i; done
2009-09-18 02:51:12
User: dennisw
Functions: echo
Tags: bash strings

Bash 4 will let you do {00..19} to get leading zeros, but Bash 3 doesn't have that feature. This technique gets you partway there (the sequences need be such that the last digit ranges from zero to nine - you can't use this for something like Bash 4's {03..27}, for example). When this limitation is not a problem, you can avoid some complicated string manipulation for concatenating leading zeros.

You can add more digits like this: {0..1}{0..9}{0..9} (ranges from 0 to 99 with up to two leading zeros). To pad with additional zeros:

for i in 000{0..1}{0..9}; do echo $i; done


for i in {0..1}{0..9}; do echo "000$i"; done

This is useful for creating values to sort or for creating filenames with a fixed format. Note that this will also work:

touch {0..1}{0..9}
echo sortmeplease|sed 's/./&\n/g'|sort|tr -d '\n'
echo sortmeplease | awk '{l=split($1,a,"");asort(a);while(x<=l){printf "%s",a[x];x++ }print "";}'
2009-09-03 10:22:39
User: foob4r
Functions: awk echo

using awk

missed the last char thanks @Josay

sudo cat /proc/kcore | strings | awk 'length > 20' | less
2009-03-09 02:19:47
User: nesquick
Functions: awk cat strings sudo
Tags: cat ram strings

This command lets you see and scroll through all of the strings that are stored in the RAM at any given time. Press space bar to scroll through to see more pages (or use the arrow keys etc).

Sometimes if you don't save that file that you were working on or want to get back something you closed it can be found floating around in here!

The awk command only shows lines that are longer than 20 characters (to avoid seeing lots of junk that probably isn't "human readable").

If you want to dump the whole thing to a file replace the final '| less' with '> memorydump'. This is great for searching through many times (and with the added bonus that it doesn't overwrite any memory...).

Here's a neat example to show up conversations that were had in pidgin (will probably work after it has been closed)...

sudo cat /proc/kcore | strings | grep '([0-9]\{2\}:[0-9]\{2\}:[0-9]\{2\})'

(depending on sudo settings it might be best to run

sudo su

first to get to a # prompt)