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Commands tagged reverse from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged reverse - 10 results
dpipe /usr/lib/openssh/sftp-server = ssh $REMOTE_HOST sshfs whatever:$LOCAL_PATH $REMOTE_PATH -o slave
2014-03-25 17:40:34
User: em
Functions: ssh
2

While `sshfs $REMOTE_HOST:$REMOTE_PATH $LOCAL_PATH` "pulls" a directory from the remote server to the local host, the above command does the reverse and "pushes" a directory from the local host to the remote server.

This makes use of the "slave" option of sshfs which instructs it to communicate over plain stdin/stdout and the `dpipe` tool from vde2 to connect the sftp-server stdout to the sshfs stdin and vice-versa.

tac $FILETOREVERSE
tac $FILE
printf "g/^/m0\nw\nq"|ed $FILE
alias sorth='sort --help|sed -n "/^ *-[^-]/s/^ *\(-[^ ]* -[^ ]*\) *\(.*\)/\1:\2/p"|column -ts":"'
3

Once you get into advanced/optimized scripts, functions, or cli usage, you will use the sort command alot. The options are difficult to master/memorize however, and when you use sort commands as much as I do (some examples below), it's useful to have the help available with a simple alias. I love this alias as I never seem to remember all the options for sort, and I use sort like crazy (much better than uniq for example).

# Sorts by file permissions

find . -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %p\n' | sort -k1 -r -g -bS 20%

00761 drwxrw---x ./tmp

00755 drwxr-xr-x .

00701 drwx-----x ./askapache-m

00644 -rw-r--r-- ./.htaccess

# Shows uniq history fast

history 1000 | sed 's/^[0-9 ]*//' | sort -fubdS 50%

exec bash -lxv

export TERM=putty-256color

Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

nslookup {ip}
dig +short -x {ip}
2009-12-21 14:43:35
User: putnamhill
Functions: dig
Tags: IP reverse dig dns
7

The +short option should make dig less chatty.

dig -x {IP}
host {checkIp or hostname} [dns server]
2009-12-21 11:48:00
User: mccalni
Functions: host
Tags: IP reverse dns
3

I'm just a simple programmer. I find dig too verbose. host tells me alias(es) and IP address in a quick to grok format with nothing special to remember for input parameters.

With thanks to http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/how-to-test-or-check-reverse-dns/

ls -S -lhr
2009-04-28 01:28:57
User: rez0r
Functions: ls
3

This command list and sort files by size and in reverse order, the reverse order is very helpful when you have a very long list and wish to have the biggest files at the bottom so you don't have scrool up.

The file size info is in human readable output, so ex. 1K..234M...3G

Tested with Linux (Red Hat Enterprise Edition)