Commands by Sekenre (2)

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"at" command w/o the resource usage/competition issues
EXAMPLES jb "next sun 12pm" "/bin/sh ~you/1.sh" & jb "2010-08-29 12:00:00" "~you/1.sh" & jb "29aug2010 gmt" ". ~you/1.sh" & jb 12:00p.m. "nohup ./1.sh" & jb 1min "echo stop!" & SEE ALSO parsedate(3) strftime(3)

resume scp-filetransfer with rsync
resume a partial scp-filetransfer with rsync

Reads a CD/DVD and creates an dvdisaster iso image with the advanced RS02 method.

Discovering all open files/dirs underneath a directory
It may be helpful in case you need to umount a directory and some process is preventing you to do so keeping the folder busy. The lsof may process the +D option slowly and may require a significant amount of memory because it will descend the full dir tree. On the other hand it will neither follow symlinks nor other file systems.

Pause and Resume Processes
Add that and "cont () { ps -ec | grep $@ | kill -SIGCONT `awk '{print $1}'`; }" (without the quotes) to you bash profile and then use it to pause and resume processes safely

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

check spell in c source code

Currency Conversion
This works in Mac OS X (10.6.2) (natively comes with curl) usage: currency_convert $1(amount) $2(from_denomination) $3(to_denomination)

Randomize lines (opposite of | sort)
random(6) - random lines from a file or random numbers

Pronounce an English word using Merriam-Webster.com
Looks up a word on merriam-webster.com, does a screen scrape for the FIRST audio pronunciation and plays it. USAGE: Put this one-liner into a shell script (e.g., ~/bin/pronounce) and run it from the command line giving it the word to say: $ pronounce lek If the word isn't found in merriam-webster, no audio is played and the script returns an error value. However, M-W is a fairly complete dictionary (better than howjsay.com which won't let you hear how to pronounce naughty words). ASSUMPTIONS: GNU's sed (which supports -r for extended regular expressions) and Linux's aplay. Aplay can be replaced by any program that can play .WAV files from stdin. KNOWN BUGS: only the FIRST pronunciation is played, which is problematic if you wanted a particular form (plural, adjectival, etc) of the word. For example, if you run this: $ pronounce onomatopoetic you'll hear a voice saying "onomatopoeia". Playing the correct form of the word is possible, but doing so might make the screen scraper even more fragile than it already is. (The slightest change to the format of m-w.com could break it).


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