Commands by ene2002 (9)

  • see the partition Show Sample Output


    -4
    fdisk -l
    ene2002 · 2014-02-16 12:54:38 0

  • -2
    nmap -sS -O -v -oS - 192.168.2.0/24
    ene2002 · 2014-01-31 18:04:06 8
  • Watch a dig in progress Show Sample Output


    1
    watch -n1 dig google.com
    ene2002 · 2013-12-26 19:23:27 3
  • I wanted an easy way to list out the sizes of directories and all of the contents of those directories recursively. Show Sample Output


    1
    du -h --max-depth=1 /path/folder/
    ene2002 · 2013-07-09 19:56:13 0
  • UBNT iwlist command Show Sample Output


    -2
    iwlist ath0 scanning |egrep '(ESSID|Signal|Address)'| \sed -e 's/Cell - Address:*//g' -e 's/ESSID://g' \-e 's/Noise level=-//g' -e 's/dBm//g' \-e 's/Quality=*//g' -e 's/Signal level=-//g' \-e 's/"//g'
    ene2002 · 2013-05-04 08:48:45 2
  • This works just as well for SMTP. You could run this on your mail server to watch e-mail senders and recipients: tcpdump -l -s0 -w - tcp dst port 25 | strings | grep -i 'MAIL FROM\|RCPT TO' Show Sample Output


    4
    tcpdump -l -s0 -w - tcp dst port 25 | strings | grep -i 'MAIL FROM\|RCPT TO'
    ene2002 · 2013-03-18 18:55:20 10

  • 1
    nmap -T4 --script broadcast-pppoe-discover 192.168.122.0/24
    ene2002 · 2013-02-18 13:26:48 0

  • 0
    tcpdump -i eth0 -s 65535 -w test_capture
    ene2002 · 2013-02-07 19:29:02 0

  • 1
    tcpdump -i eth0 port http or port smtp or port imap or port pop3 -l -A | egrep -i 'pass=|pwd=|log=|login=|user=|username=|pw=|passw=|passwd=|password=|pass:|user:|userna me:|password:|login:|pass |user '
    ene2002 · 2013-02-07 19:14:58 0

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search the manual page names and descriptions

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Stream audio over ssh
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