Commands by freethinker (3)

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Create user add lines from partial passwd file
Handy if you are installing a new server or recovering an old one and you have a passwd file with the accounts you want to add to the server. If you edit the file so that only the accounts that you want to add are left this line will spit out the correct useradd lines. The uid, gecos and shell will be preserved.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Simple addicting bash game.
hold period (or whatever character) and hit enter after a second. You need to make the next line of periods the same length as the previous line... score starts at 0 and increase each time length of line is same.

Show git log beautifully
Only show a short of important information inline ( include branch info ), and color this log tree.

pretend to be busy in office to enjoy a cup of coffee
The first parameter after timeout is the key parameter; number of seconds to wait. With a 6 you have 600 seconds for your coffee break (10min).

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

ls -hog --> a more compact ls -l
I often deal with long file names and the 'ls -l' command leaves very little room for file names. An alternative is to use the -h -o and -g flags (or together, -hog). * The -h flag produces human-readable file size (e.g. 91K instead of 92728) * The -o suppresses the owner column * The -g suppresses the group column Since I use to alias ll='ls -l', I now do alias ll='ls -hog'

list all opened ports on host

Conficker Detection with NMAP

a simple bash one-liner to create php file and call php function


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