Commands by juangmorales (1)

  • Functionally the same as the Microsoft Robocopy (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robocopy) command below but with the benefits of compression and optionally specifying a user. robocopy /e [//host]/source/path [//host]/destination/path Options: -a: archive mode - rescursive, copy symlinks as symlinks, preserve permissions, preserve modification times, preserve group, preserve owner, preserve device files and special files -hh: Numbers in human-readable K=1024 format. Single "h" will produce human-readable K=1000 format -m: don't copy empty directories -z: use compression (if both source and destination are local it's faster to omit this) --progress: Shows progress during the transfer and implies --verbose (verbose output) --stats: Summary after the transfer stops Show Sample Output


    0
    rsync -ahhmz --progress --stats [[user@]host:]/source/path/ [[user@]host:]/destination/path/
    juangmorales · 2014-11-13 18:52:45 5

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