Commands by kseistrup (3)

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List top 20 IP from which TCP connection is in SYN_RECV state
List top 20 IP from which TCP connection is in SYN_RECV state. Useful on web servers to detect a syn flood attack. Replace SYN_ with ESTA to find established connections

Write a listing of all directories and files on the computer to a compressed file.
This command is meant to be used to make a lightweight backup, for when you want to know which files might be missing or changed, but you don't care about their contents (because you have some way to recover them). Explanation of parts: "ls -RFal /" lists all files in and below the root directory, along with their permissions and some other metadata. I think sudo is necessary to allow ls to read the metadata of certain files. "| gzip" compresses the result, from 177 MB to 16 MB in my case. "> all_files_list.txt.gz" saves the result to a file in the current directory called all_files_list.txt.gz. This name can be changed, of course.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Test your total disk IO capacity, regardless of caching, to find out how fast the TRUE speed of your disks are
Depending on the speed of you system, amount of RAM, and amount of free disk space, you can find out practically how fast your disks really are. When it completes, take the number of MB copied, and divide by the line showing the "real" number of seconds. In the sample output, the cached value shows a write speed of 178MB/s, which is unrealistic, while the calculated value using the output and the number of seconds shows it to be more like 35MB/s, which is feasible.

One command line web server on port 80 using nc (netcat)
Very simple web server listening on port 80 will serve index.html file or whatever file you like pointing your browser at http://your-IP-address/index.html for example. If your web server is down for maintenance and you'd like to inform your visitors about it, quickly and easily, you just have to put into the index.html file the right HTML code and you are done! Of course you need to be root to run the command using port 80.

Get MD5 checksum from a pipe stream and do not alter it

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Find the biggest files
Also: * find . -type f -exec ls -s {} \; | sort -n -r | head -5 * find . -type f -exec ls -l {} \; | awk '{print $5 "\t" $9}' | sort -n -r | head -5

Configure second monitor to sit to the right of laptop
You'll need to make sure your xorg.conf permits a virtual screen size this big. If it doesn't then xrandr should return a suitable error message that tells you the required size.

Awesomeness Confirmation Bias


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