Commands by noahspurrier (2)

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Create a simple video contact sheet using the vcs bash script
Assumes you've downloaded Toni Corvera's vcs script (http://p.outlyer.net/vcs), have it in your PATH, and have installed the script's dependencies. Generates a video contact sheet of 24 thumbnails and 3 thumbnails per column. The bold font and white-on-black color scheme keeps the text readable at the chosen 70% JPEG compression quality, which keeps the file size at a manageable level. You can go even lower with the quality and get a good looking result.

draw mesh

TCP and UDP listening sockets
This command show listening sockets TCP and UDP. Useful for stop unwanted services from linux.

Resets your MAC to a random MAC address to make you harder to find.
Next time you are leaching off of someone else's wifi use this command before you start your bittorrent ...for legitimate files only of course. It creates a hexidecimal string using md5sum from the first few lines of /dev/urandom and splices it into the proper MAC address format. Then it changes your MAC and resets your wireless (wlan0:0).

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Get a diff of two json arrays
jq is amazing for manipulating json on the commandline, but the developers have some weird ideas about how to handle shell redirections. This command works around them. Further reading: https://github.com/stedolan/jq/issues/1110

Big Countdown Clock in seconds
Requires figlet. Other than that, this should be portable enough across all the Bourne-compatible shells (sh, bash, ksh, zsh, etc). Produces a massive number using figlet that counts down the number of seconds for any given minute interval. For example, here's a 4-minute timer: $ i=$((4*60)); while [ $i -gt 0 ]; do clear; echo $i | figlet; sleep 1; i=$(($i-1)); done; And a 1-minute timer: $ i=$((1*60)); while [ $i -gt 0 ]; do clear; echo $i | figlet; sleep 1; i=$(($i-1)); done;

Backup with SSH in a archive
$PRIVATEKEY - Of course the full path to the private key \n $HOST - The host where to get the backup \n $SOURCE - The directory you wish to backup \n $DESTINATION - The destination for the backup on your local machine

Show (only) list of files changed by commit
Lists ONLY the files changed by the given HASH/HEAD/list of hashes, etc. The message, commit ID, author, etc. is not included

Search some text from all files inside a directory


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