Commands by patko (7)

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Encrypted archive with openssl and tar
Create an AES256 encrypted and compressed tar archive. User is prompted to enter the password. Decrypt with: $ openssl enc -d -aes256 -in | tar --extract --file - --gzip

Shell function to create a menu of items which may be inserted into the X paste buffer.
The function will take a comma separated list of items to be 'selected' by xsel -i: $ smenu "First item to paste,Paste me #2,Third menu item" You will then be prompted to choose one of the menu items. After you choose, you will be able to paste the string by clicking the middle mouse button. The menu will keep prompting you to choose menu items until you break out with Control-C.

Determine status of a RAID write-intent bitmap
Report information about a bitmap file.

Get list of servers with a specific port open
Change the -p argument for the port number. See "man nmap" for different ways to specify address ranges.

Random numbers with Ruby
There's been a few times I've needed to create random numbers. Although I've done so in PERL, I've found Ruby is actually faster. This script generates 20 random "10" digit number NOT A RANDOM NUMBER. Replace 20 (1..20) with the amount of random numbers you need generated

Open files in a split windowed Vim
-o acts like :spit. Use -O (capital o) for side-by-side like :vsplit. Use vim -d or vimdiff if you need a diff(1) comparison. To split gnu Screen instead of vim, use ^A S for horizontal, ^A | for vertical.

Create a bunch of dummy text files
Using the 'time' command, running this with 'tr' took 28 seconds (and change) each time but using base64 only took 8 seconds (and change). If the file doesn't have to be viewable, pulling straight from urandom with head only took 6 seconds (and change)

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Format date/time string for a different day
The "date' command has options to easily format the date, day, month, time, etc. But what if you want a relative date or time. Like, I wanted yesterday's date in a particular format. You may want the exact date of "2 months ago" or "-3 days" nicely formatted. For that, you can use this command. The --date option takes fuzzy parameters like the ones mentioned in the previous sentence.

Get absolut path to your bash-script
Another way of doing it that's a bit clearer. I'm a fan of readable code.


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