Commands by piyo (12)

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SVN Clean
Removes all unversioned files and folders from an svn repository. Also: $ svn status --no-ignore | grep ^I | awk '{print $2}' | xargs rm -rf will remove those files which svn status ignores. Handy to add to a script which is in your path so you can run it from any repository (a la 'svn_clean.sh').

Salvage a borked terminal
If you bork your terminal by sending binary data to STDOUT or similar, you can get your terminal back using this command rather than killing and restarting the session. Note that you often won't be able to see the characters as you type them.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

easily strace all your apache processes
This one-liner will use strace to attach to all of the currently running apache processes output and piped from the initial "ps auxw" command into some awk.

create an screenshot, upload it to your server via scp and then open that screenshot in firefox
I often need to send screenshots to other people to explain settings and whatever. So I created this oneline which I use to create the screenshot with imagemagik, upload it via scp to my server and then the command opens an firefox tab with the screenshot. The screenshot can be a region or a window. You just have to replace the parts beginning with YOUR.

launch bash without using any letters
I don't know why anyone would use this, I was just messing around tonight and managed to start bash without using any letters and thought I would share. It's pretty simple, first it tries to execute "-" redirecting stderr to stdout which prints the error "bash: -: command not found" to standard output, then I try to execute "bash: -: command not found" which produces the output "bash: bash: -: command not found: command not found". lastly, (on the other side of the semicolon) I use the underscore environment variable which refers to the last command run ("bash: -: command not found") and take out everything after the first ":" character using brace expressions and your left with "bash"

Retrieve a list of all webpages on a site
This spiders the given site without downloading the HTML content. The resulting directory structure is then parsed to output a list of the URLs to url-list.txt. Note that this can take a long time to run and you make want to throttle the spidering so as to play nicely.

Right-align text in console using pipe like ( command | right )

Rename files with vim.
Opens a list of files in a text editor. Using Vim as your default editor allows you to use the power of regex substitution and visual block mode to batch rename files. Found in the renameutils package sudo apt-get install renameutils

Select rectangular screen area
Hold 'Ctrl' + 'Alt' key while selecting rectangular text area of the screen with left mouse button. Should work in any terminal screen (xterm, konsole, ...) under X, if not then try with 'Ctrl' + 'Shift' + 'Alt' or two-combination of these.


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