Commands by skarfacegc (1)

  • Shows which applications are making connections, and the addresses they're connecting to. Refreshes every 2 seconds (watch's default). Test on OSX, should work anywhere watch and lsof work. Show Sample Output


    0
    watch "lsof -i -P |grep ESTABLISHED |awk '{printf \"%15.15s \\t%s\\n\", \$1, \$9}'"
    skarfacegc · 2013-04-03 02:04:11 2

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