Commands by zil0g (1)

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check open ports without netstat or lsof

lists files and folders in a folder
lists files and folders in a folder with summary.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Remove all HTML tags from a file

Determine if a command is in your $PATH using POSIX
it is generally advised to avoid using which(1) whenever possible. which(1) is usually a csh(1) script, or sometimes a compiled binary. It's output is highly variable from operating system to operating system, so platform independent scripts could become quite complicated with the logic. On HP-UX 10.20, for example, it prints "no bash in /path /path /path ..."; on OpenBSD 4.1, it prints "bash: Command not found."; on Debian (3.1 through 5.0 at least) and SuSE, it prints nothing at all; on Red Hat 5.2, it prints "which: no bash in (/path:/path:...)"; on Red Hat 6.2, it writes the same message, but on standard error instead of standard output; and on Gentoo, it writes something on stderr. And given all these differences, it's still variable based on your shell. This is why POSIX is king. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/081 for more ways on avoiding which(1).

Rename files in batch

See where a shortened url takes you before click

Blank/erase a DVD-RW

Mark packages installed with build-dep for autoremove (on Debian/Ubuntu)
Replace PACKAGE with desired package name. Found here: http://mikebeach.org/2011/04/undo-apt-get-build-dep/

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.


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