Commands tagged gateway (9)

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Display screen window number in prompt
Add this to your $HOME/.bashrc file. It will only set this prompt if it is running inside screen ($WINDOW var is set) Looks like this... $ [email protected]:~[2]$

Remove everything except that file
Remove everything except that file with shell tricks inside a subshell to avoid changes in the environment. $ help shopt

Convert spaces in file names to underscores

Create a video screencast (capture screen) of screen portion, with audio (the audio you hear, not your mic)
Errors in output don't matter. Stop recording: ctrl-c. Result playable with Flash too. IMPORTANT: Find a Pulse Audio device to capture from: pactl list | grep -A2 'Source #' | grep 'Name: ' | cut -d" " -f2

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Advanced ls using find to show much more detail than ls ever could
This alias is super-handy for me because it quickly shows the details of each file in the current directory. The output is nice because it is sortable, allowing you to expand this basic example to do something amazing like showing you a list of the newest files, the largest files, files with bad perms, etc.. A recursive alias would be: $ alias LSR='find -mount -printf "%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G %TF_%TR %CF_%CR %AF_%AR %#15s [%Y] %p\n" 2>/dev/null' From: http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

history autocompletion with arrow keys
This will enable the possibility to navigate in the history of the command you type with the arrow keys, example "na" and the arrow will give all command starting by na in the history.You can add these lines to your .bashrc (without &&) to use that in your default terminal.

Add a progress counter to loop (see sample output)
For this hack you need following function: $ finit() { count=$#; current=1; for i in "[email protected]" ; do echo $current $count; echo $i; current=$((current + 1)); done; } and alias: $ alias fnext='read cur total && echo -n "[$cur/$total] " && read' Inspired by CMake progress counters.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Resume scp of a big file


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