Commands tagged maintenance (1)

  • attempts to delete all local branches. git will fail on any branches not fully merged into local master, so don't worry about losing work. git will return the names of any successfully deleted branches. Find those in the output with grep, then push null repositories to the corresponding names to your target remote. assumes: - your local and remote branches are identically named, and there's nothing extra in the remote branch that you still want - EDIT: you want to keep your local master branch


    0
    git branch | cut -c3- | grep -v "^master$" | while read line; do git branch -d $line; done | grep 'Deleted branch' | awk '{print $3;}' | while read line; do git push <target_remote> :$line; done
    gocoogs · 2011-08-13 16:58:34 0

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