Commands tagged commas (1)

  • This modifies the output of ls so that the file size has commas every three digits. It makes room for the commas by destructively eating any characters to the left of the size, which is probably okay since that's just the "group".   Note that I did not write this, I merely cleaned it up and shortened it with extended regular expressions. The original shell script, entitled "sl", came with this description:    : '  : For tired eyes (sigh), do an ls -lF plus whatever other flags you give  : but expand the file size with commas every 3 digits. Really helps me  : distinguish megabytes from hundreds of kbytes...  :  : Corey Satten, corey@cac.washington.edu, 11/8/89  : '   Of course, some may suggest that fancy new "human friendly" options, like "ls -Shrl", have made Corey's script obsolete. They are probably right. Yet, at times, still I find it handy. The new-fangled "human-readable" numbers can be annoying when I have to glance at the letter at the end to figure out what order of magnitude is even being talked about. (There's a big difference between 386M and 386P!). But with this nifty script, the number itself acts like a histogram, a quick visual indicator of "bigness" for tired eyes. :-) Show Sample Output


    2
    /bin/ls -lF "$@" | sed -r ': top; s/. ([0-9]+)([0-9]{3}[,0-9]* \w{3} )/ \1,\2/ ; t top'
    hackerb9 · 2014-09-29 14:33:23 0

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.

Get the ip registered to a domain on OpenWRT
I use this in a script on my openwrt router to check if my DynDNS needs to be updated, saves your account from being banned for blank updates.

List your largest installed packages (on Debian/Ubuntu)

Remove a line in a text file. Useful to fix
In this case it's better do to use the dedicated tool

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Make changes in .bashrc immediately available
Any changes to BASH shell made in .bashrc will be active in the current terminal window from the moment you execute this command, ie. aliases, prompt settings etc. No need to restart terminal. (In BASH 'source' simile to 'eval' lets you generally execute any bunch of commands stacked in a text file).

send a circular

Inverted cowsay
It's quite fun to invert text using "flip.pl" (ref: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2078323 ). Slightly more challenging is to flip a whole "cowsay". :-)

Multiple SSH Tunnels
Thankfully, the ssh command allows you to specify multiple tunnels through the same server in one command. Remeber if you want a priviliged port on your machine, you must use root or sudo account.

Extract IPv4 addressess from file


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: