Insert commas to make reading numbers easier in the output of ls

/bin/ls -lF "$@" | sed -r ': top; s/. ([0-9]+)([0-9]{3}[,0-9]* \w{3} )/ \1,\2/ ; t top'
This modifies the output of ls so that the file size has commas every three digits. It makes room for the commas by destructively eating any characters to the left of the size, which is probably okay since that's just the "group".   Note that I did not write this, I merely cleaned it up and shortened it with extended regular expressions. The original shell script, entitled "sl", came with this description:    : '  : For tired eyes (sigh), do an ls -lF plus whatever other flags you give  : but expand the file size with commas every 3 digits. Really helps me  : distinguish megabytes from hundreds of kbytes...  :  : Corey Satten, corey@cac.washington.edu, 11/8/89  : '   Of course, some may suggest that fancy new "human friendly" options, like "ls -Shrl", have made Corey's script obsolete. They are probably right. Yet, at times, still I find it handy. The new-fangled "human-readable" numbers can be annoying when I have to glance at the letter at the end to figure out what order of magnitude is even being talked about. (There's a big difference between 386M and 386P!). But with this nifty script, the number itself acts like a histogram, a quick visual indicator of "bigness" for tired eyes. :-)
Sample Output
# Note that this command is designed to be kept in a script called "sl"
hardy%  sl /var/log/apache2/ 
total 436376
-rw-r--r-- 1 root ro 420,341,429 Sep 29 07:03 access.log
-rw-r--r-- 1 root roo 22,671,391 Sep 29 06:49 error.log
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 3,272,040 Jan 20  2013 gallery_access.log
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root    99,837 Jan 20  2013 gallery_error_log

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