Commands tagged nmap; (1)

  • In the field, I needed to script a process to scan a specific vendor devices in the network. With the help of nmap, I got all the devices of that particular vendor, and started a scripted netcat session to download configuration files from a tftp server. This is the nmap loop (part of the script). You can however, add another pipe with grep to filter the vendor/manufacturer devices only. If want to check the whole script, check in http://pastebin.com/ju7h4Xf4 Show Sample Output


    0
    nmap -sP 10.0.0.0/8 | grep -v "Host" | tail -n +3 | tr '\n' ' ' | sed 's|Nmap|\nNmap|g' | grep "MAC Address" | cut -d " " -f5,8-15
    jaimerosario · 2014-12-26 18:31:53 0

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