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Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

Exclude inserting a table from a sql import
Starting with a large MySQL dump file (*.sql) remove any lines that have inserts for the specified table. Sometimes one or two tables are very large and uneeded, eg. log tables. To exclude multiple tables you can get fancy with sed, or just run the command again on subsequently generated files.

List only directory names
This command would be useful when it is desirable to list only the directories. Other options Hidden directory $ ls -d .*/ Other path $ ls -d /path/to/top/directory/.*/ Long format: $ ls -ld */

Create multiple mp4 files using avidemux
Convert multiple files using avidemux. Version updated (thanks to the guys who helped me giving me hints about how to improve the command). Works with files whose name contains blank characters. One of the reasons why I love open source: everyone can take something "done" and improve it to make it better! If u have suggestions, please let me know.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

batch convert Nikon RAW (nef) images to JPG
converts RAW files from a Nikon DSLR to jpg for easy viewing etc. requires ufraw package

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Watch RX/TX rate of an interface in kb/s
A shorter version

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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