Commands tagged installed size (1)

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Count lines of code across multiple file types, sorted by least amount of code to greatest
The same as the other two alternatives, but now less forking! Instead of using '\;' to mark the end of an -exec command in GNU find, you can simply use '+' and it'll run the command only once with all the files as arguments. This has two benefits over the xargs version: it's easier to read and spaces in the filesnames work automatically (no -print0). [Oh, and there's one less fork, if you care about such things. But, then again, one is equal to zero for sufficiently large values of zero.]

split a string (3)

Get a regular updated list of zombies
to omit "grep -v", put some brackets around a single character

Create a listing of all possible permissions and their octal representation.

Show one line summaries of all DEB packages installed on Ubuntu based on pattern search
I sometimes want to know what packages are installed on my Ubuntu system. I still haven't figured out how to use aptitude effectively, so this is the next best thing. This allows finding by name. The grep '^ii' limits the display to only installed packages. If this is not specified, then it includes listing of non-installed packages as well.

Grab IP address on machine with multiple interfaces
Instead of hard-coding in a check to scrape info from ifconfig based on a specific interface, do it in a more portable way. This works really well if you switch between wired, wireless, bluetooth or even VPN connections. You can get your current IP in a script (since it'll be something like tun0 instead of eth0 or wlan1). This uses a well known public ip address 8.8.8.8, but it doesn't actually connect to it, it just shows you the route it would take.

List the size (in human readable form) of all sub folders from the current location
Simple and easy to remember. -h is human, -d1 = depth 1. disk usage, human, depth 1

eDirectory LDAP Search for Statistics
Find statistics for an Edirectory server form LDAPsearch. We have a lot more examples at: http://ldapwiki.willeke.com/wiki/Ldapsearch%20Examples The full command got shut off it is: ldapsearch -h ldapserver.willeke.com -p636 -e C:\mydata\treerootcert.der -b "" -s base -D cn=admin,ou=administration,dc=willeke,dc=com -w secretpwd "(objectclass=*)" chainings removeEntryOps referralsReturned listOps modifyRDNOps repUpdatesIn repUpdatesOut strongAuthBinds addEntryOps compareOps wholeSubtreeSearchOps modifyEntryOps searchOps errors simpleAuthBinds inOps oneLevelSearchOps inBytes abandonOps bindSecurityErrors securityErrors unAuthBinds outBytes extendedOps readOps dsaName directoryTreeName vendorVersion vendorName

list files recursively by size

Generate a random left-hand password
Generates a random 8-character password that can be typed using only the left hand on a QWERTY keyboard. Useful to avoid taking your hand off of the mouse, especially if your username is left-handed. Change the 8 to your length of choice, add or remove characters from the list based on your preferences or kezboard layout, etc.


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