Commands tagged save (4)

  • Faster then other method using wget For obtain all commands use nu=`curl http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/browse |grep -o "Terminal - All commands -.*results$" | grep -oE "[[:digit:],]{4,}" | sed 's/,//'`; curl http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/browse/sort-by-votes/plaintext/[0-"$nu":25] | grep -vE "_curl_|\.com by David" > clf-ALL.txt For more version specific nu=`curl http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/browse |grep -o "Terminal - All commands -.*results$" | grep -oE "[[:digit:],]{4,}" | sed 's/,//'`; curl http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/browse/sort-by-votes/plaintext/[0-"$nu":25] | grep -vE "_curl_|\.com by David" > clf-ALL_"$nu".txt Also download dirctly from my dropbox My drop box invitaion link is http://db.tt/sRdJWvQq . Use it and get free 2.5 GB space. Show Sample Output


    2
    curl http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/browse/sort-by-votes/plaintext/[0-9000:25] | grep -vE "_curl_|\.com by David" > clf-ALL.txt
    totti · 2011-11-08 12:19:48 1
  • The simpler, 1-arg version is save_function(){ { date +"# %F.%T $1; declare -f "$1";}| tee -a ~/.bash_functions; }` Show Sample Output


    2
    save_function(){ while [[ $# > 0 ]]; do { date +"# %F.%T $1; declare -f "$1";}| tee -a ~/.bash_functions; shift; done;}
    mcint · 2019-07-17 01:06:59 0

  • 0
    :w !sudo tee %
    KodjoSuprem · 2013-09-25 08:56:21 0
  • Yeah, there are many ways to do that. Doing with sed by using a for loop is my favourite, because these are two basic things in all *nix environments. Sed by default does not allow to save the output in the same files so we'll use mv to do that in batch along with the sed. Show Sample Output


    -3
    for files in $(ls -A directory_name); do sed 's/search/replaced/g' $files > $files.new && mv $files.new $files; done;
    bassu · 2009-05-07 20:13:07 14

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renice by name

alt + 1 .
alt + number + dot will insert last command argument at $number place, alt + 0 + . will print last command name. For example $ ls /tmp /var $ ls /usr /home alt + 1 + . will result in '/usr' , if you press alt + . again, it will result in '/tmp' alt + 0 + . -> 'ls'

Show linux kernel modules dependencies
Use modprobe to list all the dependencies of a certain kernel module. Handy when debugging system issues.

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

full path listing in /directory/path/* of javascript files.
file listing in /directory/path/* of specific files such as javascript(js) .

Draw kernel module dependancy graph.
parse "lsmod" output to "dot" format and pass it to "display". Without perl!

Create a persistent connection to a machine
Create a persistent SSH connection to the host in the background. Combine this with settings in your ~/.ssh/config: Host host ControlPath ~/.ssh/master-%[email protected]%h:%p ControlMaster no All the SSH connections to the machine will then go through the persisten SSH socket. This is very useful if you are using SSH to synchronize files (using rsync/sftp/cvs/svn) on a regular basis because it won't create a new socket each time to open an ssh connection.

Terminal - Show directories in the PATH, one per line with sed and bash3.X `here string'
another method : awk '{gsub(/:/, "\n");print}'

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

peak amount of memory occupied by any process with "FOO" in its name
Show the maximum amount of memory that was needed by a process at any time. My use case: Having a long-running computation job on $BIG_COMPUTER and judging whether it will also run on $SMALL_COMPUTER.   http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man5/proc.5.html VmHWM: Peak resident set size ("high water mark")


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